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How long do you leave a bullet in the chamber when carrying hot? I typically chamber a round and don't remove it for days. I carry and lock it up with a round in the pipe. I always keep my weapon secure, so I don't bother removing the round. However, I have had a couple of rounds come out with the bullet pushed back into the casing a little ways. Now the ammunition I have been carrying isn't very high quality and I plan on getting some better ammo, but I can't figure out how the bullet is getting pushed back into the casing. Does it have something to do with leaving the round in the pipe for too long? I haven't fired any of these rounds and I don't think I dare. Any input or ideas on how/why this is happening?

Also, any recommendations on some good ammunition to use while carrying concealed? Thanks.

Ironmarshmallow
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
By the way, I carry a Springfield XD 9mm compact, if that makes any difference.
 

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The bullet gets pushed back in the case from hitting the feed ramp or the top of the chamber (it's called set-back) in the feed process. Bullet set-back can increase pressures, sometimes to the point it becomes dangerous. Repeatedly chambering the same cartridge tends to incrementally push the bullet back into the case each time the cartridge is chambered. Just having a cartridge in the chamber will not cause the bullet to recess into the case; it requires some mechanical action to occur.

Bullet set-back can be prevented by not repeatedly chambering the same round and periodically shooting the ammo in the magazine you usually carry and replacing with fresh ammo.
 

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Car Knocker said:
The bullet gets pushed back in the case from hitting the feed ramp or the top of the chamber (it's called set-back) in the feed process. Bullet set-back can increase pressures, sometimes to the point it becomes dangerous. Repeatedly chambering the same cartridge tends to incrementally push the bullet back into the case each time the cartridge is chambered. Just having a cartridge in the chamber will not cause the bullet to recess into the case; it requires some mechanical action to occur.

Bullet set-back can be prevented by not repeatedly chambering the same round and periodically shooting the ammo in the magazine you usually carry and replacing with fresh ammo.
Thanks for the info.
 

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I rarely take a round out of the chamber. My gun is either on me or in a small GunVault in my closet just a step from my bed. I keep the safe locked when unattended and open at night to facilitate quick access. Handling the gun unnecessarily and constantly loading/unloading is asking for an accident (in my opinion). And it also results in bullet setback as Car Knocker described.

To avoid set back, when I go to the range every few weeks, I take the magazine out, shoot the chambered round, then shoot my range ammo out of other magazines. When I'm done, I chamber the next round in my carry magazine. When I get home, I empty and clean the gun, rechamber the same bullet, and then top off my carry magazine. It's not necessarily the best way, but it's become habit and it typically means the same round is never chambered more than twice.

Be sure to check out this thread where SGT Jensen shows setback reaching dangerous levels after only a few times being chambered.
 

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apollosmith said:
I rarely take a round out of the chamber. My gun is either on me or in a small GunVault in my closet just a step from my bed. I keep the safe locked when unattended and open at night to facilitate quick access. Handling the gun unnecessarily and constantly loading/unloading is asking for an accident (in my opinion). And it also results in bullet setback as Car Knocker described.

To avoid set back, when I go to the range every few weeks, I take the magazine out, shoot the chambered round, then shoot my range ammo out of other magazines. When I'm done, I chamber the next round in my carry magazine. When I get home, I empty and clean the gun, rechamber the same bullet, and then top off my carry magazine. It's not necessarily the best way, but it's become habit and it typically means the same round is never chambered more than twice.

Be sure to check out this thread where SGT Jensen shows setback reaching dangerous levels after only a few times being chambered.
:agree:

This is darn near exactly what I do, except, when I need to unload (range trips or cleaning only) I simply unload all bullets and mix em up then reload them. I figure I can do this 20-30 times before the same bullett has been loaded more than 3-4 times. Not the most scientific way, but works for me. After a few months, I simply shoot the full mag then reload with fresh. BTW I carry GoldDots.
 

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I recommend high quality ammo for personal protection purposes. Speer Gold Dots, Federal Lawman, Remingtion Golden Saber, etc. are excellent choices. As for the set back issue, I mix up the rounds every time I reload my magazine. I practice shooting about once a week, at which time I shoot the rounds in my carry magazine. Another idea would be to alternate the carry magazine with your spare mags.

gf
 

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I've had problems with bullet setback in my XD40 with 155-gr. Gold Dot ammo. I've started riding the slide as I chamber a round, and setback doesn't seem to happen anymore. But I still watch for it. I haven't had any problem with my .45 ACP, either with Fed. Hydra-shoks or Win. Ranger T's, but I'm riding the slide with them too.

I can't just leave a shell in the chamber, because I practice quite a bit with the guns I carry. And factory ammo is too expensive to waste that way. My reloads seem to shoot to the same point of aim as my carry rounds, so I feel like I'm shooting the kind of thing I carry. I do shoot a few factory rounds maybe every 3 months (the ones on the top of the magazines), but I don't waste a whole magazine.

By the way, I don't just guess if there's setback, I measure the rounds in the magazine against ammo still in the box.
 

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The only time I unload my 1911 is to do weekly cleaning and lubing on it. I they move the chambered round to the back of the mag (mark it). That way I always have a fresh round in the chamber. After 8 weeks will fire off the rounds at the range. I use Federal 230gr HST. In my wheel guns I also use Federal HST, just keep them loaded, no bullet push back in them, the good thing about a revolver :D
 

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rdoggsilva said:
In my wheel guns I also use Federal HST, just keep them loaded, no bullet push back in them, the good thing about a revolver :D
Good point. Some shooters have reported the exact opposite problem with .357 Magnum ultra-lightweight revolvers; the bullets will work out of the case from the snappy recoil (I think the reports mostly concerned hot 110-gr. rounds) and bind the cylinder so that it can't rotate.
 

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Car Knocker said:
rdoggsilva said:
In my wheel guns I also use Federal HST, just keep them loaded, no bullet push back in them, the good thing about a revolver :D
Good point. Some shooters have reported the exact opposite problem with .357 Magnum ultra-lightweight revolvers; the bullets will work out of the case from the snappy recoil (I think the reports mostly concerned hot 110-gr. rounds) and bind the cylinder so that it can't rotate.
This is true, I have seen it happen on two airlight S&W revolvers.
 

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When I did my "test" I would lock the slide back, and press the slide release, letting it fly forward on its own. I assume this is how most people chamber a round in their auto loader. When I need to unload, then chamber a round, I do not hit the slide release and let it go by itself. What I do is this.

With the magazine removed, lock the slide to the rear.
Visually check the chamber to ensure that it is in fact unloaded.
Insert a full magazine.
Point the weapon in a safe direction.
Grab the rear of the slide, pull back to release the slide lock, and slowly ride it forward.
Remove the magazine, and top it off, reinsert the magazine, and holster the weapon.

This works well with my Glock, and bullet setback is minimized.
 

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I do not fire 357 rounds in my 2" Rossi, to hard to handle with this gun. I use 125gr +P's.

The 462 is a 6 shot revolver and built on the Smith K frame.
 

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230 grain Federal Hydrashok (HST). I have not noticed any setback issues in any of the 1911's I have tried them in.
 
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