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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


The magnum research baby eagle in .40, is a double action, high capacity, all steel pistol. The baby eagle is one of the many CZ-75 clones made in Italy by Tanfoglio. It is generally considered to be a very slim design, for a large caliber pistol with a double-stack magazine, with "natural" pointing due to the grip angle. It currently comes in a full size with a barrel length of 4.52", semi-compact of 3.93", and polymer compact of 3.64".

This pistol is issued in current service throughout the Israeli Security Forces. It originally started out chambered in the .41 AE, considered to be a magnum round, but since that round never caught on it is now chambered in .45, .40, and 9mm. The price of a band new full size .40 is around $450 to $550.

The baby eagle features a polygonal rifled barrel. The benefits of a Polygonal barrel are:
Higher velocities due to reduced friction of the bullet in the barrel, as the polygonal rifling has less surface area than the lands and grooves of a traditionally rifled barrel.
Less bullet deformation, resulting in reduced drag on the bullet which helps to increase range and accuracy.
Increased barrel life and reduced buildup of copper or lead within the barrel
Image of Polygonal riffling next to standard.


The first time I handled a baby eagle my first impression was that this gun was solid, no rattle when I shook it, and that it was the most comfortable pistol I'd ever held or shot. I’m no marksman and have a basic understanding of pistol shooting at best, I can only comment that this gun is more accurate than I am. At 10 yards im placing 12 shots into an area a little larger than a half dollar, while my brother who is a much better shot is putting them in a quarter sized hole.

The controls of the gun are very easily manipulated and are in the typical places. It comes with a right and left hadned saftey. The trigger was a bit rough at first but after 50+ rounds it is as smooth as my 1911. The DA trigger pull is very long and heavy around 13lbs to pull, while the SA trigger pull is light and short at 4lbs of pull. The sights are white dot and are large and easily seen.

Downsides:
This gun is not for everyone, parts are available through Magnum research. They sell grips, holsters, and sights. But aftermarket parts are hard to find. To put on a light or laser you have to purchase a rail that clamps onto the trigger guard unless you buy the compact polymer version that has a rail built on.

Why I picked it:
Because this gun is so comfortable for me to shoot, point shoots so well, holds 12+1 rounds of .40 and is hefty enough to pistol whip someone with. The price had a lot to do with it as well. It is my everyday carry choice and a favorite target shooting gun. After 1000+ rounds it has never had a single failure with types of ammo i've put through it. Mostly reloads, Fedral FMJ, Hydroshocks, and Gold dots.

Here are the stats for the full size .40 from the Magnum research website.
Black, steel frame, slide safety, decocker
Double action/Single action
Barrel length 4.52" (full-size)
Grip, full-size 3 3/4" *
Weight w/empty magazine 2 lbs. 6.6 oz. (9mm) **
Weight w/empty magazine 2 lbs. 5.9 oz. (.40S&W) **
Overall length 8 1/4"
Height 5 3/4"
Width 1 1/8"

more info
http://www.gunblast.com/RKCampbell_BabyDesertEagle.html
http://www.magnumresearch.com/Baby_Eagle.asp
 

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Good review and a nice gun. The Beagle has not caught as fast as some other guns (largely to due to its big brother) but it is no sloth in the performance department.
 
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Does your polygonal rifled bore really look like that?

As I understand it there is a significant difference between polygonal rifling and a polygonal bore.

The image from Wiki seems to be a polygonal bore rather than polygonal rifling.
 

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Eukatae said:
Does your polygonal rifled bore really look like that?

As I understand it there is a significant difference between polygonal rifling and a polygonal bore.

The image from Wiki seems to be a polygonal bore rather than polygonal rifling.
Thats basicly the way it will look. It is the same on all HK guns. They are more accurate because of the polygonal rifling than our cut or button rifled barrels.
 

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Jeff Johnson said:
Very nice review. That sounds like a fun gun to shoot.

I was told, however, that unjacketed lead should not be used in guns with polygonal rifling, as it fouls up too much. Am I mistaken?
As a general rule you should stay away from lead with any modern gun (even though most will do just fine)
 

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xmirage2kx is correct. just one clairification. solid lead should not be used in Semi-Auto's...at all. They are not designed for anything but jacketed rounds. Shoot lead in revolvers or lever action rifles all you want. Good job though, xmirage2kx.
 

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howlingwolfarms said:
just one clairification. solid lead should not be used in Semi-Auto's...at all. They are not designed for anything but jacketed rounds. Shoot lead in revolvers or lever action rifles all you want.
As someone who's shot tens of thousands of lead bullets through semi-autos, I'm curious as to the reasoning behind your comment.
 

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Car Knocker said:
howlingwolfarms said:
just one clairification. solid lead should not be used in Semi-Auto's...at all. They are not designed for anything but jacketed rounds. Shoot lead in revolvers or lever action rifles all you want.
As someone who's shot tens of thousands of lead bullets through semi-autos, I'm curious as to the reasoning behind your comment.
From the design aspect of the guns they were engineered around ball ammo. Copper jackets offer less friction during the loading/chambering steps in the guns function. It doesn't really do anything to the barrels but foul them more. This was just a part of their engineering since John Browning and the 1911 pistol. If they are working for you thats great. Most manufacturers do not recommend using lead. I hope I clairified my point a little better.
be safe and good shooting.
 

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My understanding is that lead actually wears less on the barrels, but fouls them much more, requiring frequent cleaning. I've put hundreds of lead bullets through my XD9SC (my father-in-law gave me a big box of them for Christmas) with no problems at all -- but I have been careful to clean it thoroughly after every outing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What I have read about the poly barrels is that Glock says no lead while Kahr, HK and Magnum Research dont specify either way. I've not shot any lead bullets, all FMJ so I cant say speak from experiance.
 

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swillden said:
My understanding is that lead actually wears less on the barrels, but fouls them much more, requiring frequent cleaning. I've put hundreds of lead bullets through my XD9SC (my father-in-law gave me a big box of them for Christmas) with no problems at all -- but I have been careful to clean it thoroughly after every outing.
You're right. The lead bullets doesn't wear the barrels really at all because lead is so soft. The problem comes when one shoots them and doesn't make sure to clean every bit of lead back out. I have seen barrels pluged with lead bullets. Mostly with .22's. One particular .22 rifle I witnessed had about a foot of lead packed in the barrel and the guy couldn't figure out why he couldn't hit the broad side of a barn. Not the sharpest tool in the shed that guy. But it shows the down side of lead bullets. Enough fouling and the bullet will not exit the barrel and you can end up with a bad trip the the hospitol.
 

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I wonder how many people shoot but never clean their guns. I was taught -- first by my father and then by the military -- that weapons should always be thoroughly cleaned every time they're shot. I'll admit that I sometimes let it go if I've only shot a few rounds and I know I'm going to be shooting again soon, but I never let it go for long.
 

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I do a basic barrel swab and oiling after every shooting and a detailed strip after 1000 rounds. I save the wire brush and more harsh cleaning methods for about every 5000 rounds.
 

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xmirage2kx said:
I save the wire brush and more harsh cleaning methods for about every 5000 rounds.
Do you think the wire brush can wear the barrel? I'd think brass is nearly incapable of wearing on steel.
 

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I have a Kahr with a polygonal barrel, and I don't shoot lead bullets in it. If the polygonal barrel of a Glock shouldn't have lead bullets shot through it, the Kahr's barrel shouldn't be any different. The wisdom is that a polygonal barrel leads much faster than a rifled barrel.

However, I disagree about not shooting lead bullets in a semi-automatic handgun. One of the standard target loads for the .45 ACP uses the lead semi-wadcutter. Of course the semi-auto normally has shallower rifling (designed for jacketed bullets), but if the velocity of a lead bullet is too high, any rifled barrel can have leading.
 
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