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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had any experience carrying the Beretta 9000 and what inside the pants holster would you recomend? Also what equipment will I need besides a weapon will i need to get my CCW permit?

I have put about 350 rounds through my .40 Beretta 9000 with no problems. I have fired several different kinds of ammo through it, usually high grade and grain. I have heard so much bad about this weapon but have never had the slightest problem. The slide is a little stiff and my wife has a hard time chambering a round. The grip is a little funny but with the pinky extension it holds just fine.
 

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daveyG said:
Also what equipment will I need besides a weapon will i need to get my CCW permit?
There is no official requisite equipment for your permit.

Unofficially, you'll need a holster/ammo/accessory collection for your 9000.. Then you'll need another gun to keep her company, then another holster/ammo/accessory collection for the new gun... Soon they'll want you to adopt more guns into the family.. And if you're REALLY fortunate your wife will share your passion for the fine art of firearms. :D

But seriously, finding the right holster can be more difficult than choosing the sidearm. I haven't seen any IWB holsters made specifically for that model, your best bet might be to take it (unloaded in a case is best for this) to Sportsman's Warehouse or any other gun-friendly store and try a few holsters on the gun, the sales people are usually quite helpful for this too. Your choice of IWB is great for all around concealment and that model isn't too big for it. I use a variety of holsters for different attire needs; IWB, paddle, shoulder, pocket or even fanny pack depending on what I'm wearing and where I'm going.
 

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Davy,

As has been said, no OFFICIAL requirement for *ANY* equipment to get your permit, you don't even need to have a gun.

HOWEVER, you should figure out where you plan on taking the class and then ask the instructor of THEIR requirements. Some require live-fire, some don't. Some places can rent a gun to you for this, others can't; however, an instructor-lender might be another possibility -- again, ask the instructor what you will need to bring to class with you.

Now, in order to carry:

1) Figure out what gun and ammo you want to carry
2) Figure out HOW you want to carry and what holster will accommodate that
3) Think about what you might want to wear for your standard concealment garment (in the winter months I've been wearing my coat most of the time I'm out of the house (even in the office), in the fall/spring I wear a light military vinyl-poncho type over-the-head jacket. I haven't carried in the summer months yet but I'm thinking I will wear an unbuttoned button0up collared shirt as my concealment garment most of the time. Course if you are going to carry in some other way, like ankle-carry, you have a whole host of OTHER questions and considerations -- the important thing is to think them through AHEAD of time (i.e.: right now while getting your permit).

4) Figure out whether or not you want to carry other OPTIONAL accessories such as: an extra mag, a tac-light, OC, knife, etc. and how you plan to carry and deploy them.

That's stuff your "?" made me think of. Another thing I think you should do is spend this time reading the ACTUAL Utah State gun laws. When you go to class, take a notebook and pen and take notes. GET TO KNOW THE LAWS, they are probably the MOST VITAL accessory/equipment I can think of. Know both your Rights and your Responsibilities and limits. You'll never know it all of course, it's a constant learning lesson, but do your best.
 

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bane said:
Davy,

Another thing I think you should do is spend this time reading the ACTUAL Utah State gun laws. When you go to class, take a notebook and pen and take notes. GET TO KNOW THE LAWS, they are probably the MOST VITAL accessory/equipment I can think of. Know both your Rights and your Responsibilities and limits. You'll never know it all of course, it's a constant learning lesson, but do your best.
:agree: Anybody who carries should have a copy of Utah Gun Laws, 3rd Edition by Mitch Vilos. You will have a huge advantage if you read the book prior to taking the class, or at least getting your permit. Impact Guns in Ogden had a few copies for around $20. Well worth the investment IMO.
 

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Ooooooh boy....where do I start.

I've got a 9000S in .40 cal and as the Bible would say, it sucketh. An acquaintance and I purchased the same guns together and I have shot his as well with similar results. I would not trust that gun with my life EVER. Constant stovepiping is the biggest problem. On my last outing with one of our forum members (NotSoSimple), we had an FTF on the first shot and 2 stovepipes before I tossed the thing aside for the day.

It seems to perform well until I have emptied a single magazine through it. Once it's a little dirty, it jams up right away.

It's also to small for my hands. The hammer has bitten that little web between my thumb and pointer more than once. Even drawn blood.

As for holsters, I've only got a cheapie Unlce Mike's that's alright, but the thing shifts around a little too much for me.

My .02 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for your reply. I have to say that i have been looking at several forums before I joined this one and I'm glad I did. I have been studing Utah laws and I'm suprised of how *loose they are. One could interprit them several ways. I agree with the thought that a Government that governs least governs best so I'm fine with this. *And happy after so many years on the east coast where crooks had the advantage to carry while tax payers did not. I have alot to learn from all of you and hope to contribute in the future.
As far as the 9000 goes, it only likes high grade and grain ammo (180 gr.) I have had no problems with this weapon other than the heavy spring. Although it does have the internal saftey as well as the ability to be locked and loaded, I prefer not to have a round in the chamber. I have taken a liking to Winchester.
I have heard of the complaints on stovepiping and have found that the people who complain of this, (which is a serious complaint indeed) also disliked the grip and how fat and short it was. This causes me to believe that the blow-back, and lack of comfort causes a slip that causes the malfunction in the compact pistol.
 
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