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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody had experience with this type of locking mechanism? Appears to give really quick access. No punching buttons or having to get a key. Kind of pricey though.

http://www.nragunsafe.com/

Cabelas: Inprint Pistol Vault

(NOTE: Edited to shorten the Cabelas link to avoid excessive length. See Rule #8:
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Thanks - Jeff)
 

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I haven't been too impressed with the Biometric safes. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't (on average 7/10 times for me on various models) - and 70% operational success is not sufficient for my standards.

The other thing I have against biometric is the ability of a criminal to use my print if I were unconscious or heaven forbid with my chopped off finger (I know it sounds extreme but still). I would much rather have them need to keep me alive and conscious to open the safe - hence I prefer the GunVault.

Just my $0.02.
 

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GeneticsDave said:
I haven't been too impressed with the Biometric safes. Sometimes they work and sometimes they don't (on average 7/10 times for me on various models) - and 70% operational success is not sufficient for my standards.

The other thing I have against biometric is the ability of a criminal to use my print if I were unconscious or heaven forbid with my chopped off finger (I know it sounds extreme but still). I would much rather have them need to keep me alive and conscious to open the safe - hence I prefer the GunVault.

Just my $0.02.
GeneticsDave, have you tried the Biometeric GunVault?
 

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No, I have only tried the Inprint, the NRA and another larger safe that I don't recall the manufacturer (I remember it was a company I had never heard of before).

I would like to try the GunVault as I generally like their products. I haven't seen any demonstration models at local retailers yet - let me know if you see them anywhere.
 

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GeneticsDave said:
No, I have only tried the Inprint, the NRA and another larger safe that I don't recall the manufacturer (I remember it was a company I had never heard of before).

I would like to try the GunVault as I generally like their products. I haven't seen any demonstration models at local retailers yet - let me know if you see them anywhere.
I will be sure and post something here when I'm able to find one that I can do a little T&E with.
 

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My cousin bought one and he didn't like it. It was pretty cool when it worked but it wasn't 100% reliable. We deduced that his problem was that he works as a body shop painter. So he is using sand paper daily and his prints are constantly ground down. Atleast I hope that is what is was, because I can't imagine trying to sell something for self defense that isn't as reliable as it should be. As far as I know he sold it to another guy who likes it very much. Sorry, I can't remeber what brand it was, but I think he bought it from Cabelas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
GeneticsDave said:
heaven forbid with my chopped off finger (I know it sounds extreme but still). Just my $0.02.
From the NRA vault manual.
Q: Can someone cutoff my finger and try to use it to open the BioVault?
A: No, BioVault 2.0 uses technology that detects live fingers for scanning, so in the unfortunate event that a detached finger is used to attempt access the unit will not open.

Thanks for the replies. I guess I'll continue my research.
 

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Am I the only one that has watched the Mythbusters episode where they fooled 2 different types of biometric scanners????
 

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TARFU said:
GeneticsDave said:
heaven forbid with my chopped off finger (I know it sounds extreme but still). Just my $0.02.
From the NRA vault manual.
Q: Can someone cutoff my finger and try to use it to open the BioVault?
A: No, BioVault 2.0 uses technology that detects live fingers for scanning, so in the unfortunate event that a detached finger is used to attempt access the unit will not open.

Thanks for the replies. I guess I'll continue my research.
Boy do I have a deal for you on some ocean front property in Arizona. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
natehunts said:
Cool, how'd they do it?
The only way I can think of is to use a temperature sensor attached to the scanning location.
 

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TARFU said:
natehunts said:
Cool, how'd they do it?
The only way I can think of is to use a temperature sensor attached to the scanning location.
All you gotta do to get around that is heat the finger.

Tarzan
 

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Even still the finger doesn't just go cold and gray when cut off. I would guess they use some sort of Biorhythm or pulse technology - just seems like more time to open the vault.

To be honest - severed fingers wasn't my main concern. I would be worried more about being knocked unconscious and dragged to the safe. Biometric just doesn't seem to be as secure as a code that's in my head.
 

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GeneticsDave said:
Even still the finger doesn't just go cold and gray when cut off. I would guess they use some sort of Biorhythm or pulse technology - just seems like more time to open the vault.

To be honest - severed fingers wasn't my main concern. I would be worried more about being knocked unconscious and dragged to the safe. Biometric just doesn't seem to be as secure as a code that's in my head.
good point
 

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I agree with the knocked-out-cold scenario (that it's likely to be problematic with a biovault). I also agree that having a biovault be reliable enough in an emergency is likely to be problematic.

However, keeping the safe from registering your fingerprint if your finger is cut off is actually a pretty easy thing to do -- ever used the heart-rate monitor on a cardio machine (again, getting it to WORK can be problematic... but those things register several variables, (including: sweat/moisture of finger, pressure you are applying to the sensor, and temperature) all to determine a close approximation of your heart rate; seems to me if they are sensitive enough to determine you HR they will certainly be able to tell when your HR is 0 (dead).
 

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This is all interesting, but isn't it just a lot easier and better to have a real safe for the guns that you don't use to protect your home and self and for the ones you do use you teach your kids to keep their cotton-picking hands off?

That is what I did and it worked well for my 5 kids.

To put it in prospective in 2004, the last year for complete data the following were accidental causes of death for children 14 and under;

Motor vehicle accidents 2431
Fire 474
Falls 107
Ingesting household chemicals 86
Discharge of a firearm 63

No death of a child is a good thing, but do you put your household chemicals in a Bio-safe?

Tarzan
 

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Tarzan1888 said:
This is all interesting, but isn't it just a lot easier and better to have a real safe for the guns that you don't use to protect your home and self and for the ones you do use you teach your kids to keep their cotton-picking hands off?
Oh, I agree with you! I wasn't trying to say otherwise (honest!) -- I was just pointing out that the fear of being able to use a cut-off finger to open the safe seems, to me, an unfounded one.

But, for the other 2 reasons mentioned, I agree that a bio safe may not be the best way to go. In my house we don't have ANY safe except the holster the gun sits in. Course we don't have kids, either -- but considering I will be packing pretty much anytime I'm not sleeping, I don't think it will be an issue then either.

I grew up with my dad storing 3 rifles under the bed, a handgun in his nightstand, and a handgun in his closet. And I never touched them once (except when we were out shooting)... I admit I did go in and peek at them once or twice but I never touched them and to my knowledge neither did either of my siblings.
 

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bane said:
Tarzan1888 said:
This is all interesting, but isn't it just a lot easier and better to have a real safe for the guns that you don't use to protect your home and self and for the ones you do use you teach your kids to keep their cotton-picking hands off?
I grew up with my dad storing 3 rifles under the bed, a handgun in his nightstand, and a handgun in his closet. And I never touched them once (except when we were out shooting)... I admit I did go in and peek at them once or twice but I never touched them and to my knowledge neither did either of my siblings.
From the time I was 8 My dad kept a gun in my room. He told me it was loaded and ready to fire and I was only to touch it if my life was in danger, or else my life would be in danger :shock:
The next 12 years I only ever touched it when I was given permission.

Nothing Like the fear of dad to overcome any curiosity a young boy would have. I don't know if I will take that same path with my son, but it worked for me.
 

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Tarzan1888 said:
This is all interesting, but isn't it just a lot easier and better to have a real safe for the guns that you don't use to protect your home and self and for the ones you do use you teach your kids to keep their cotton-picking hands off?
We have touched on this before in another thread that talked about the GunVault. Tarzan, I agree, it is better to teach your kids gun safety than just lock up your guns. Like I stated before, people with small children might need a quick access safe to protect their fully loaded firearm from rugrats and toddlers (who are too little to comprehend the danger of a loaded firearm).

However, I think there is another reason to keep your firearms locked - even when you have older children. I always wonder how kids get a hold of their parents guns and use them criminally or sell them - I have a better idea now, perhaps it is because parents aren't being responsible enough with storage. It's one thing to teach your child respect for firearms, but like the previous posts have stated, it doesn't completely eliminate curiosity. I would hate to be responsible for my gun being used to do something bad because I didn't have it physically secured. Now I know this delves into proper raising of children and I don't want to spark that conversation, but sometimes, despite the best parents, kids just do stupid things.
 

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GeneticsDave said:
but sometimes, despite the best parents, kids just do stupid things.
Nah... I never did anything stupid that my parents said not to do. :mrgreen: :twisted:
 
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