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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my CFP yesterday and decided to take my gun along for a few chores. and I found the experience pretty uncomfortable. It was uncomfortable on several levels. First of all it was a little unnerving I was very self conscience of whether my gun was printing or slipping free. I was also found it uncomfortable trying to be awareness code yellow instead of code white. It was also physically uncomfortable I'm not used to having something in my waist like that. I don't really like driving with my wallet in my pocket so sitting down with a gun in my waist was really uncomfortable.

I guess it will just take some getting used to.

Has anyone else had similar first experiences? How long did it take you to get used to it? I have the disadvantage that I cannot carry at work so I won't be carrying most of the day everyday so it may take me a while to get used to it.
 

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marksman said:
Has anyone else had similar first experiences? How long did it take you to get used to it? I have the disadvantage that I cannot carry at work so I won't be carrying most of the day everyday so it may take me a while to get used to it.
Just a thought,

I have carried OWB, SOB shoulder holster and I now carry IWB at between 9:00 and 9:30. This creats a cross-draw carry that is quite comfortable sitting and driving. It also allows easy access to your weapon from any position and generally only marks from the front where most folks don't look.

A good quality holster with a thumb break will make you feel a little more secure as well.

DJ
 

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tapehoser said:
Hoslter quality makes a HUGE difference.
:agree:
If you have a comfortable holster (one that feels good and you KNOW is holding your firearm securely) your concerns will lighten significantly. Holster advice is difficult as we are all shaped differently, etc, but what are you using for a holster and at what position are you placing it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am using a Galco® Stow-N-Go Holster. Most people on Cablea's website recommended it with the biggest complaint being that it was hard to reholster the gun after drawing it this wasn't a huge concern for me since I really don't planning on drawing and reholstering my gun alot. And I figured as long as I could draw well that was what was most important. I'm caring it at about 3:30 or 4:00.
 

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A good holster, a good belt, and finding the 'sweet' spot are vital. These take some time. Even then, it takes a while for the holster to adjust to your body and vice versa. And you'll slowly get over the worries of printing. It just takes some time.

Wearing it EVERY day is the best way to quickly become comfortable.

In fact, when I read the subject of this thread, I had a little panic moment where I thought I had forgotten to put on my gun this morning because I couldn't tell it was there at all. I had to actually feel it to make sure it was there. It's taken a few months to get to this point.
 

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I struggled with it for awhile too, but like apollosmith said get a good belt. The majority of my problems went away with a good belt and holster. It is important not to skimp when choosing these items - they are essential elements to your carry gear.

Keep it up and it'll get better! :shades:
 

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This is my personal opinion, applies to me only, and should not be construed to apply to anyone else or as a criticism of anyone's choice of holsters.

For what I carry and my body type, I would not call the Galco® Stow-N-Go Holster or other holsters of this type a "quality" holster. It would not work well for me because:

1- It has no molding and very little retention.

2- The single clip allows too much movement. This is exacerbated if an undersize and soft belt is used.

3- It's too narrow and presses deeply into the body and the narrowness doesn't allow the holster to distribute the weight properly along the belt.

5- Judging from the photo, the reinforcing around the mouth of the holster would be an irritant to my oh-so-delicate body. Also, my preference is for smooth-side out - much easier on the skin.

6- For me, holsters of this type allow the pistol butt to protrude too much. I prefer holsters with 2 widely spaced belt loops or clips to keep that butt tucked in. Holsters similar to the Milt Sparks VM-2 work well for me.
 

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I agree with Don and the others. You need a quality belt and a good holster. I don't think the Stow-N-Go qualifies. I have a couple soft-sided holsters and they are ALL uncomfortable. In fact, I wish I had never bought them at all - they just sit in my junk box (for some reason I think I might use them someday, but that is doubtful). You need a good molded leather or kydex holster that evenly distributes pressure from the sidearm across the entire length of the holster. This should minimize pain and discomfort. It is also a good idea to get a holster that had two belt clips so you not only distribute the downward weight of the sidearm and holster, but also prevent unnecessary movement and displacement. Many of these holsters allow you to cant (rotate) the holster forwards or backwards thus facilitating a quick draw.

Some good ones I would recommend are the Milt Sparks Versa Max 2, the Comp-Tac C.T.A.C. and the CrossBreed Super-Tuck/Deluxe. There are many more out there, but these are very popular. You should realize that a quality holster is going to run you at least $50. I have found that anything cheaper than that tends to not be sufficient for daily carry. Of course I am sure someone has a cheap one they like, but in most cases, you are better off spending a little more dough on your sidearm, holster, belt and self-defense ammo.

Good luck!
 

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Lots of great advice given to ya so far. OCing will help all though, lol Try different holsters, belts, don't be so self conscious might help. For me so far, OWB with a jacket is good enough, this summer it will be either OC or OWB with a tee shirt un-tucked, or maybe something else.
 

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I carried concealed at home quite a lot as practice before I carried out-and-about much. Had to get over the urge to adjust and check it and also trying different cover garments.

As has already been said, a good stiff carry belt is essential. And experiment with different holsters of different types and in different positions.

Practice being more alert all the time, not just when carrying. That way it will become more second nature.

Tony
 

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I am new to this hole thing. I now carry OWB and I am loving it! No has made a issue with me yet!

But I do have a question. there was a statement made about "awareness code yellow instead of code white". What in the heck does that mean? I am trying to learn everything that I can. But get lost sometimes down the road.
 

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cityslicker5413 said:
But I do have a question. there was a statement made about "awareness code yellow instead of code white". What in the heck does that mean? I am trying to learn everything that I can. But get lost sometimes down the road.
I believe these are "Front Sight" codes/alerts.
 

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GeneticsDave said:
Some good ones I would recommend are the Milt Sparks Versa Max 2, the Comp-Tac C.T.A.C. and the CrossBreed Super-Tuck/Deluxe. There are many more out there, but these are very popular. You should realize that a quality holster is going to run you at least $50. I have found that anything cheaper than that tends to not be sufficient for daily carry. Of course I am sure someone has a cheap one they like, but in most cases, you are better off spending a little more dough on your sidearm, holster, belt and self-defense ammo.

Good luck!
+1. Good holster AND a good GUN BELT and you can carry a .50 cal D. eagle easier and with more comfort than you could carry a kel-tec with a bad holster and a cheap belt.
 

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Acquiring the zen associated with CCW takes time. The hard part is finding a holster/belt combination that works for you and your wardrobe. Some of us have ended up with more holsters than Imelda Marcos has shoes finding the right combination.

Then you need to get use to it. It's just like breaking in a pair of shoes or a new pair of jeans. Once you are use to doing it then you will get more uncomfortable without it. It will be like not wearing socks with your shoes when you don't have it on you.

Being aware not only applies to personal protection but defensive driving as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The place I work has an anti-gun policy (which isn't so bad because they also have pretty tight security) so I'm not going to be carrying all day. I also have some solutions setup at home that don't require me to carry at home. I probably spend 98% of my time at one of those 2 places. That being said I find it hard to justify spending 100 dollars on a Milt sparks for weekends and the occasional trip to wally world. I have a decent belt It's a badger belt I picked up and sportsmans because it was thick and rigid.

I guess I'll just have to start collecting my pennies if I don't get more used to it after the next couple tries.
 

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If you give it time, you will get used to a "bad" holster. I had a "bad" holster that I got used to...never really comfortable, but at least I got used to it. Then I bought the CROSSBREED and thought I had died and gone to CC Heaven. If I didn't carry 24/7 I probably wouldn't have minded just using the "bad" holster on nights and weekends.
As far as getting used to the idea that you are carrying, I simply echo what everyone else has said.... Just give it time and you will get used to it. And at some not so distant point in the future, not having your gun with you will be like not having your wallett with you. You feel lost without it.
 

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You want comfort? This is the way to go.



This is a Taurus Titanium 44 Spl. It weighs only one pound and 8 ounces fully loaded. Carried outer waist band at 2:30 to 3:00 it is very comfortable, covered with a jacket or untucked shirt, or openly.

Frankly I hate things under the belt.

A popular carry gun has been the XD. I have an XD 45. Fully loaded it weighs 2 pounds and eight ounces. I can sure tell the extra weight when I carry that one.



This is a comfy carry too, but as I said, I can notice the extra weight over the revolver.

If you like to go with shirt tucked in, I suggest a IWB tuckable type holster. Others have already given you a heads up on some good ones.

This can be a problem deciding on somthing that is doable with our lifestyle and dress. For sure it has to be comfortable or we won't carry very much. Good luck.
 
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