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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
TriciaDodge said:
So...how did it go? :dunno:
Well, I don't even think she noticed me carrying, even when I hugged her. Of course I was careful to kinda side-hug her... She certainly didn't mention it, and I didn't get a lecture. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
My dad did ask me about our gun storage situation though, in the context of us having to lock everything dangerous or interesting away from our psychopathic 6 year old, but I think he was satisfied with my answer.
 

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I'm also in the "lucky" camp; my mom and dad both have their permits and the only conflict we have is that I don't think they shoot enough (especially my mom) and I don't think they carry enough. My MIL isn't into guns, but doesn't have a problem with them, which is good because my FIL has a collection that can only be called an arsenal.

Anyway, what I have seen in my experience of teaching people to shoot is that a little education goes a long, long way to defusing fears. With adults, they really only take a class if they're already interested in guns, or motivated for some other reason. But I've also taught a lot of Boy Scouts and their parents to shoot, including many who really were pretty fearful at the beginning. What I've noticed in the process is that the belt-and-suspenders approach to safety that is the norm for responsible gun owners impresses people.

With that in mind, one thing to try if the subject comes up again is to explain carefully, and in detail, the exact safety precautions you take. Explain the rules of gun safety and point out that even following ONE of the rules ensures that no one can be hurt -- but that you always follow all of them, to be completely certain. Explain the purpose of a holster, how it securely keeps the gun in control and firmly attached to your body, and how it completely covers and protects the trigger. Explain the safety precautions you take at home, to ensure the gun is only accessible to you. Explain the regular practice you do, both dry fire (and the safety precautions you take when doing dry fire -- you do dry fire practice regularly, right?) and on the range. Explain the maintenance you perform on your gun, how you regularly clean it (FIRST unloading it and removing all ammunition from the area and then disassembling it, while observing all the safety rules until it's a collection of parts and no longer a gun) and function check it, to verify that its action works correctly and cannot discharge without the trigger being pressed.

In short, if she'll let you, provide in a calm, thorough manner, an explanation of all of the many things you do and know to ensure your firearm cannot harm anyone, but remains functional and ready to defend you.

Will this work? I don't know. But based on what I've seen of how peoples' attitudes change as this information is presented to them, I think it has a good chance, if she'll listen.
 
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