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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I posted in my "new guy" post... my wife and I just purchased our first handgun and signed up for the CC course later this month. I'm wondering what we should be expecting going in and, more importantly, what we can expect THEM to EXPECT OF US.

What I mean is this... while I can handle my weapon safely and easily and I can shoot safely and moderately accurately (I have a mild nervous disorder (a.k.a. "a twitch") and am near-sighted), my wife can shoot pretty accurately but hasn't done as well mastering how to manipulate the weapon... so, given that, what are we going to be expected to demonstrate in order to pass the course???

Thank You for Your Input!

~Bane
 

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You can pass if you are BLIND in Utah. Seriously you can.

My range test consisted of firing at a target about 7-10 yards away (don't remember it actually may have been closer) and you had to hit the bullseye 5 times or the target 20 times. You had unlimited ammunition! Kind of a joke actually, but I'm sure that made some lawmaker somewhere feel better. My wife was really nervous about the written test cause she doesn't like tests, but she ACED IT. I teased her that it was her first 100% ever.

-PW
 

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There's no requirements to shoot or handle a gun. Utah does not have a skills or competency test. Sit through the class and pass the background check and you're good to go.

In my class (took it at Cabela's - HIGHLY recommended!), the instructor had a semi-auto and a revolver and we simply had to demonstrate how to load (with snap caps), shoot, and unload one or the other. This wasn't required, but was informational. The guy in front of me repeatedly violated pretty much every safety rule and could NOT keep his finger off the trigger and he still passed.

We also went through several role playing situations to get us thinking about whether we would/should get involved in a situation, draw our weapons, shoot someone, etc. It was maybe an hours worth and the discussion was worth more than the actual situations presented. Again, this was just something our instructor did and is not required.

You can see the entire required curriculum for the course at http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/TRANGUIDELINES.pdf

I'd definitely come with any questions you have. If they aren't answered in the presentation, ask them. Besides that, it's pretty straight forward and easy - getting a good, not-boring instructor makes it all the better.
 

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First time I took the class I just had to sit there and listen. The second time I took it, it was at Doug's Shoot n Sports in SLC. There they do a skills test. But it isn't required by the state so if you are nervous about it just ask questions before you go take it and see what your particular instructor wants to test. Multiple choice test? I did not have that either time. First time I went through the process was back when the state wanted two character witnesses to write letters during the application process. When I took the class a second time my instructor made a good comment when someone asked why they don't do that anymore. He said God gave us the right to have and carry guns, the state is understanding that concept better now and just wants to have people understand the laws and know who is carrying.
 

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SGT Jensen said:
In my class, all we had to do was listen to the instructor, and take a multiple choice exam. We didn't even handle a firearm!
Your teacher was in error. YOu do NOT need to shoot your gun, but you do need to show proficency with your gun. This is a very broad statement and my instructor just had us load and un-load a revolver and a auto loader, with snap caps.

Tarzan
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow... *GREAT* responses from all, Thank You so much!

Now we can confidently show up for our class without being a tad nervous... and the "Guidelines" provided are excellent!

You guys are quick here! :)
 

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SGT Jensen said:
In my class, all we had to do was listen to the instructor, and take a multiple choice exam. We didn't even handle a firearm!
Ditto on that, I don't even remember a test.

He did have two toy guns, a revolver and a semi auto,
and we had to show we knew how to put plastic bullets in a plastic gun and pull a plastic trigger.

This was over 10 years ago, maybe even 15.

phox
 

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Also, another piece of advice...take it for what it's worth (not much).

Last year I took an advanced pistol course which also included all of the requirements for a standard CFP course. So the class consisted of folks who were noobies and folks who knew what they were doing.

There were several times that I had to correct one of the instructors on the general firearm code. In fact, toward the end of the course, before he would state something as fact, he was looking to me for approval to make sure that his statements were accurate.

Not all instructors have read and understand that code thoroughly.

IT IS ABSOLUTELY 100% UP TO YOU TO UNDERSTAND IT.

Had the students in that course relied upon that instructors advice, it would have left them open to possible arrest and lawsuits. It is YOUR responsibility to KNOW THE CODE.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
tapehoser said:
There were several times that I had to correct one of the instructors on the general firearm code. Not all instructors have read and understand that code thoroughly. IT IS ABSOLUTELY 100% UP TO YOU TO UNDERSTAND IT.
And this is the essence of why 'statism'/mixed economy systems are so inferior to a true capitalist society -- it's unfortunate that our country long-ago abandoned such a superior system based on individual rights and settled for a far inferior system based on so much political legalese that I can actually get "certified" by someone who apparently shouldn't be "certified" themselves!

Thank you for the hat-tip, though! It's good to realize that my instructor's credentials should be suspect.
 

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For a quick (but not necessarily complete) resource, see:
Handy links to Utah and Federal gun laws online

That includes a recommendation for a good book to buy that is specific to gun laws in Utah. Unfortunately, it's about 6 years old now, while the law does not stand still. Still, it's a great resource. What I do is learn from the book, then compare that with Utah code online.
 
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