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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning a trip to trial lake tomorrow.

Does the state own this lake?

Do they own ALL lakes?

Please answer both questions! Thanks in advance.
 

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I assume you're talking about Trial Lake in the Uintahs. It's owned by the Feds since it's in a National Forest.
 

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Pack some bear spray. I was at lily lake last week, just to the east of trial lake, and saw a momma and a good sized cub in a big meadow about 150 yards from where we were fishing. Oh and red and yellow glittery power bait was pulling them in as fast as we could cast. Had our bait robbed a few times before we even got the slack reeled in from the cast.
 

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I'm going to Mirror Lake in the Uintahs August 21-24. Will I get in trouble for taking my pistol?
 

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I have carried mine while fishing up there and nothing was ever said. just do not shot up the camp grounds, they seem to frown on that.
 

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rdoggsilva said:
I have carried mine while fishing up there and nothing was ever said. just do not shot up the camp grounds, they seem to frown on that.
I don't plan on firing it unless I have to defend myself or my family. Just feel safe knowing I can. :D
 

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Queen Kat said:
I'm going to Mirror Lake in the Uintahs August 21-24. Will I get in trouble for taking my pistol?
You might be better off with just a flash light. :ROFL: :ROFL:
http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=3934236

Woman uses flashlight to scare away bear
August 4th, 2008 @ 5:49pm
By Randall Jeppesen

A woman camping at the Mirror Lake campground was able to get a bear out of her tent by beating it with a flashlight around 2 a.m. on July 25.

The woman heard some dogs barking. According to Bruce Johnson of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, she opened her tent to see what was going on and a black bear stuck its head right inside the tent. So she took her flashlight and started hitting the bear in the head.

Johnson said, "Never hold still and allow it to continue. The best thing to do is: hit, kick, scream, beat it across the nose and the head if you can to get it out of there."

Johnson says after they were notified they closed the camping area where the bear had seen. They used dogs and traps for three days, but the bear never returned. They think dog food and dirty diapers left out by some campers attracted the bears to the area.

E-mail: [email protected]
 

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OMG! How scary!!! If it was me that bear would have ended up with a piece of lead between his eyes! But I will be taking my flashlights, too! :ROFL:

Ya know what just made me chuckle? Isn't there a person on our board that developed the black bear flashlights? That would be hilarious if that's the kind of flashlight she used!!! :lolbang:
 

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Actually, it's spelled Uinta. Also Zion National Park not Zion's, that's a bank.
 

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Beware the Trial lake dam. It is posted as federal property, and may be considered Army Corps of Engineers property, and as such is extremely verboten to carry anywhere around it.
 

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Queen Kat said:
OMG! How scary!!! If it was me that bear would have ended up with a piece of lead between his eyes.....!
Probably not a wise choice.

A bears skull is long and narrow and has very thick bone in the front that slopes up so that almost any round that hit it between the eyes would glance off.

If you shot it in the eye it would penetrate as the eye has little or no bony structure. On full frontal your only chance for penetration is to shoot it in the nose would penetrate the brain.

the other option is to place the pistol to the side of its head, around its ear and shoot. A side shot to this part of the head would penetrate the brain, especially if it were something with the penetration of a FMJ .357 Mag.

Below is a picture of mounted skulls of a Brown , Polar, and Grizzly bears.

Tarzan
 

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I disagree with Tarzan completely. A bear's skull is not bullet proof...especially not at near-point-blank range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
:thijack: ??
 

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You're right. Get the thread back on track.

So that we're clear, federally owned lands like National Parks and National Monuments are off-limits, but National Forests and State Parks are owned by the State and must follow state law by allowing legal carry.
 

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tapehoser said:
I disagree with Tarzan completely. A bear's skull is not bullet proof...especially not at near-point-blank range.
I respect your opinion, BUT I did not say a bears shull was "bullet proof" What I said is that the bones at the front of their skull are thick and sloped so that at most angles the bullet would glance off.

I also said something to the affect that the brain case is very narrow only about 4 inches wide for a grizzly and hard to hit.

If you hit them in the nose it would penetrate. If you were shooting down on the front of their head so that the trajectory of the bullet met the skull at about 90 degrees, and the caliber had sufficient penetration to blow through the thick bones of the skull it would penetrate, BUT level, front on, the angle and toughness of the skull will cause most bullets to ricochet off.

I too wondered at the reports that I had heard and read about the toughness of their skull....then I examined one closely, with my own hands and eyes and changed my mind.

For me......front on with a 12 gauge loaded with 00 Buck and slugs...I'm OK with than, but with anything else....Not for me......If a bear is on top of me I will shoot hit kick and bite him with anything I have any way I can. If I had a handgun, such as my .357 or my .45, I would try and shoot him in the side of the head near his ear.....but then that just me........Of course your mileage may vary.

Tarzan

PS "In external ballistics, point-blank range is the distance between a firearm and a target of a given size such that the bullet in flight is expected to strike the target without adjusting the elevation of the firearm (see also gun). The point-blank range will vary with the firearm and its particular ballistic characteristics, as well as the target chosen. A firearm with a flatter trajectory will permit a nearer minimum and further maximum point blank range for a given target size, while a larger target will allow for a longer point blank range for a given firearm.[1]"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_blank
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
tapehoser said:
You're right. Get the thread back on track.

So that we're clear, federally owned lands like National Parks and National Monuments are off-limits, but National Forests and State Parks are owned by the State and must follow state law by allowing legal carry.
So where can you find that info? How do you look up each particular lake?
 

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Not to discount. But I'd take the bear spray. I had a relative who was a game warden from many years ago. He had a grizzly come after him. He completely unloaded his 30-40 kraig into the bear before it dropped at its feet. The lowest I'd go with a gun is a .50 or .454. You may penetrate, but can you stop it in time. Just my two an three quarter cents. :thijack: :hijack: :withstupid: :rules: :sheriff: :beat:
 

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whiptrackercracker said:
Not to discount. But I'd take the bear spray. I had a relative who was a game warden from many years ago. He had a grizzly come after him. He completely unloaded his 30-40 kraig into the bear before it dropped at its feet. The lowest I'd go with a gun is a .50 or .454. You may penetrate, but can you stop it in time. Just my two an three quarter cents. :thijack: :hijack: :withstupid: :rules: :sheriff: :beat:
Bear Spray residue had been shown to attracts bears. The following is from a government publication advocating the use of bear spray.

"I have heard that bear spray actually attracts bears? Who would want to use something that does that?

A: I published a paper in 1998 in the Wildlife Society Bulletin (Vol. 26: 92-94) demonstrating that some Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) were attracted to bear pepper spray residues. I decided to conduct this work after I’d observed a bear vigorously rolling in pepper spray residues put down by a person who had hoped that the spray would repel bears from his floatplane tied to the beach. It hadn’t worked and his neoprene float covers were damaged. Now here I was watching a bear vigorously scent rub in the orangish stain on the beach. “What if this stuff actually attracted bears?” I began to worry, but not whether or not the spray worked as a bear deterrent but rather regarding their interest in residues on objects regardless of how they got there. I reflected on the fact that only days before I had shown a new field assistant how to use pepper spray... by discharging it just outside my field camp perimeter. It never occurred to me that the residue might prove troublesome. What if this residue actually attracted bears? Considering this further, I knew of people who had applied pepper spray to objects in the hopes of repelling bears from them. I even knew of a PhD bear research scientist who lectured on bear safety and had suggested that spray could be used in this manner to protect items that couldn’t be otherwise protected from curious bears. I felt I needed to further investigate because property and people could possibly be injured by this misuse of the product.

For this research I sprayed red pepper spray directly onto the ground then sat back and observed bears' reactions to it. Many bears were clearly attracted to spray residues, some vigorously head rubbing, back rolling, pawing and eating the soils tainted with spray. I also observed some bears responding to these sites for up to a 5 days after spray application. So not only were they attracted to it but for some time after it had been dispensed. So I published a short note hoping to warn others of the potential dangers associated with misuse of the product.

Some persons have concluded that because pepper spray was shown to elicit and hold a bear’s interest is ought not be used as a deterrent. Does this make any sense? Of course not."

http://www.absc.usgs.gov/research/brown ... rspray.htm

Now get this straight. This government employee who is an "Expert" writing in a government publication reads a study that points out that bears are attracted by bear spray residue and so he does his own study and finds out that this is true, but yet tells you that if this bothers you and makes you not want to use bear spray as a deterrent that it makes no sense.

Personally I think HE makes no sense in his assertion. He has an agenda and ignores evidence that would weaken his agenda.

He wants to protect the bears and not you.

Tarzan
 
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