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Do you keep your sidearm loaded at night ( in chamber)

  • Yes

    Votes: 26 78.8%
  • No

    Votes: 7 21.2%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used to be a big sleep walker so I'm a little concerned leaving my sidearm loaded at night (in the chamber).

Does this worry anyone else?

Since I keep mine unloaded, I worry that I'm going to wear my feed ramp out quickly with all this re-chambering each day.
 

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Put it in a holster that covers the trigger. That's what I do. I wonder if I would be able to draw my firearm while sleep walking. From what I understand of sleep walking, you are not using fine motor skills.
 

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I keep my 1911, and both revolvers loaded along with the shotgun and a big pit bull. She maybe a wimp but must people do not know it.
 

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Sleep walking could be a concern. Years ago, my little brother, got up went out side, turning on all the lights are he went, and let our dogs out of their pen. The dog pen is probably 40 yards out the back door.

I have wondered if this could be a concern. People do weird things in their sleep. Still I keep one in the pipe when I sleep.
 

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The only time my gun is not loaded is when I take Nyquil which when I have a cold. That stuff makes me sleep deep but I have some odd dreams. :taz:
 

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I keep my three semi's loaded but I don't have my revolver loaded. All of them are in my quick-access gun safe. It is even a quicker-access gun safe since I only close the door when I'm not home or there are little ones around.

rdogg, how do you keep your big pit bull loaded? :huh: :ROFL:

ian
 

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This is something I've worried about too, as I have been known to do some crazy things while I've been asleep, with absolutely no memory of it in the morning, including being able to carry on full conversations with people who thought I was awake.

Thats why for now I keep it in a quick access safe, with the door shut and locked.
 

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I have never sleep-walked so this has not been a concern for me. But it should be for those who do; like PW, my sister used to sleepwalk all the time and would wake up, go downstairs, unlock the dead-bolt to the front-door, go outside, and sit on the grass playing. Usually with one of her dolls. We had to install a chain on the door to keep her inside.
 

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Man I can't eat and read at the same time. I voted no on the poll and I should have voted yes......That is what I get for eating an apple and voting at the same time. :oops: :oops:

Tarzan
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thx997303 said:
Put it in a holster that covers the trigger. That's what I do. I wonder if I would be able to draw my firearm while sleep walking. From what I understand of sleep walking, you are not using fine motor skills.
I've been trying to find the story I read a while ago about a person that made a sandwich in their sleep. Repetitive activities are not hard to do in your sleep.
 

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xRapidDavex said:
I've been trying to find the story I read a while ago about a person that made a sandwich in their sleep. Repetitive activities are not hard to do in your sleep.
I didn't find the story you mentioned.....but I did find this;

"Sleepwalking. Sleepwalking -- or somnambulism -- is one of our most unusual sleep activities.

The characteristics of sleepwalking. Sleepwalkers have certain attributes in common.

The families. Sleepwalking is a typical, normal activity of young children; most people outgrow it (but the behavior is often passed to their children).

Abilities. Sleepwalking children tend to move awkwardly and can perform only simple tasks. Adults have achieved complex actions, such as driving a car.

Behaviors. Sleepwalkers often engage in repetitive movements; e.g., opening and closing a door incessantly. They might pursue a forbidden venture, such as eating food which is not permitted by their diet.

The wakeful precursors. Sleepwalking is most likely to occur when the wakeful activities have precipitated an unusually deep "stage 4" during the first cycle of the sleep period. That condition might have been caused by exhaustion (from strenuous wakefulness or from previous lack of sleep).

The length of time. Sleepwalking usually ends within 15 minutes.

The motivation. Sleepwalkers are generally prompted by fear or concern; they get out of bed to resolve an imagined problem. They are not responding to a REM dream.

Sleepwalking and REM. Sleepwalking does not occur during REM sleep, when "sleep paralysis" would prevent movement. It usually happens approximately one hour after the start of sleep, when we are in stage 4 of the first cycle. When sleepwalking occurs, this stage 4 period lasts for an extended period of time, and it is occasionally interrupted by brief arousals.

The dangers of sleepwalking. Perception is limited during this state, so sleepwalkers have fallen from balconies and staircases, or walked into furniture or traffic, or suffered injuries from sharp objects (or from the windows which they break). The sleepwalker's environment should be a safe one -- with no dangerous items, and a door which cannot be opened by the sleeper.

Sleeptalking. This related phenomenon generally occurs during non-REM sleep; at that time, the utterances tend to be illogical and unintelligible. However, sleeptalking can also occur during REM sleep, because sleep paralysis does not affect breathing, and the vocal apparatus is able to move enough to simulate speech. During REM, the discourse is more likely to make sense."

http://trans4mind.com/jamesharveystout/dream-11.htm

Tarzan
 

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I'm gonna do a quick hijack to tell a funny story.

My brother that I already told about had serious sleep walking problems. Anyway about the funniest story was he had been at a long scout camp and came home exhausted. So he went to bed really early. My mom was the achievement day leader at the time. Achievement days is 8-11 year old girls (LDS thing) that are similar to cub scouts. Anyway my brother came sleepwalking down the stairs and into the dining room where my mom was having an activity with about 7 of these achievment day girls. And to make it better he was in nothing but his boxers. My mom was way embaressed and had to escort him back to his bedroom. My brother was probably 16 or 17 at the time. It was pretty funny.

Sorry, back to original topic.
 

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PW said:
I'm gonna do a quick hijack to tell a funny story.

My brother that I already told about had serious sleep walking problems. Anyway about the funniest story was he had been at a long scout camp and came home exhausted. So he went to bed really early. My mom was the achievement day leader at the time. Achievement days is 8-11 year old girls (LDS thing) that are similar to cub scouts. Anyway my brother came sleepwalking down the stairs and into the dining room where my mom was having an activity with about 7 of these achievment day girls. And to make it better he was in nothing but his boxers. My mom was way embaressed and had to escort him back to his bedroom. My brother was probably 16 or 17 at the time. It was pretty funny.

Sorry, back to original topic.
He probably gave those little girls a happy memory that they giggled about for weeks and have never forgotten. :shock:

Tarzan
 

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I keep my carry firearm loaded but in a holster next to the bed with my tactical flashlight. When I get up in the morning, I put it in the dresser next to my bed while I shower and dress. I then take it with me when I leave the house.

As for my shot gun and carbine, they have rounds in the magazines but not in the chamber. That whay I do not have to constantly load and unload when I take them in and out of the gun safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My Galco holster really grabs my sidearm. It is hard for me to tug on it and get the gun out when it is not on my hip. I would not want to fumble with that at night if I need it.
 

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Ramiguy said:
We keep a loaded gun, flashlight, and spare magazine on each side of the bed.
+1 -- us too! Plus OC.
 
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