Utah Guns Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hope you all have a great and safe Memorial Day weekend , I will be heading out to the desert to shoot a few rounds. :D
:raiseflag: :patriot: :flag:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I'd like to add my 2 cents to everyone for a safe weekend! And a chance to teach / remember what we have the day off ( most of us) for anyway.

I miss my folks everyday!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,791 Posts
justintime said:
I'd like to add my 2 cents to everyone for a safe weekend! And a chance to teach / remember what we have the day off ( most of us) for anyway.

I miss my folks everyday!
Your avatar is sweet! I expect to be doing yard work, cleaning out shed and garage all weekend. Maybe get some shooting in Monday.
My flag will be flying proudly all weekend on my home!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
Remember that if you have a flag and pole, raise the flag to full mast in the morning, then lower it to half staff. Then at noon, raise it again to full mast.

As for those of use with little flag poles sticking off the side of our house or in the lawn, you don't actually have to lower the flag to half staff. You can either do nothing or tie a black ribbon to the top of the pole. If you tie a ribbon, it too should be removed at noon.

Have a happy and safe Memorial Day!

:raiseflag:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
YAY :party3:

Yes everybody have a great and safe weekend! I'm going shooting today too with my neighbor.

I wish I had a flag pole, I realy want to get one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
GeneticsDave said:
Remember that if you have a flag and pole, raise the flag to full mast in the morning, then lower it to half staff. Then at noon, raise it again to full mast.

As for those of use with little flag poles sticking off the side of our house or in the lawn, you don't actually have to lower the flag to half staff. You can either do nothing or tie a black ribbon to the top of the pole. If you tie a ribbon, it too should be removed at noon.

Have a happy and safe Memorial Day!

:raiseflag:
Ya know ,, I thought I came to this forum to see what an old cowboy is up to once in a while. But then I find stuff like this and find not only do I learn something but I like reading things here too..Thanks Dave and all the rest of you brainy gun geeks..
whew.. 3days can't wait

PS Hey Cowboy!!! I like PW's clean the shed idea, now that you have one you can put stuff in it so you can clean it..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
As a member of the American legion I will be at different cemeteries for Memorial Day celebrations. Have a safe and fun weekend. :flag: :patriot: :raiseflag:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
Yes, everyone have a great Memorial Day. I also might be going to the range tomorrow. :crown:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,616 Posts
Lest we forget indeed.

One of the things that I like about reading the Patriot email newsletters is that they frequently include profiles of valor ... specific stories about the extraordinary valor and selflessness of those fighting for our freedoms in hostile places. The latest Patriot Digest has four profiles of valor for Memorial Day:
On this Memorial Day, four young men who served in Iraq and Afghanistan will not be at the malls, nor will they be at the family barbecue.

These young men are not much different from others who have served in the past or those serving today in our nation’s Armed Forces but for the fact that they responded to extraordinary circumstances with extraordinary courage.

They are Corporal Jason L. Dunham, USMC; Master-at-Arms Second Class Michael A. Monsoor, USN; Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith, USA; and Lieutenant Michael P. Murphy, USN.

Their Medal of Honor citations read:

DUNHAM, JASON L. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Rifle Squad Leader, 4th Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines (Reinforced), Regimental Combat Team 7, First Marine Division (Reinforced), on 14 April 2004. Corporal Dunham’s squad was conducting a reconnaissance mission in the town of Karabilah, Iraq, when they heard rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire erupt approximately two kilometers to the west. Corporal Dunham led his Combined Anti-Armor Team towards the engagement to provide fire support to their Battalion Commander’s convoy, which had been ambushed as it was traveling to Camp Husaybah. As Corporal Dunham and his Marines advanced, they quickly began to receive enemy fire. Corporal Dunham ordered his squad to dismount their vehicles and led one of his fire teams on foot several blocks south of the ambushed convoy. Discovering seven Iraqi vehicles in a column attempting to depart, Corporal Dunham and his team stopped the vehicles to search them for weapons. As they approached the vehicles, an insurgent leaped out and attacked Corporal Dunham. Corporal Dunham wrestled the insurgent to the ground and in the ensuing struggle saw the insurgent release a grenade. Corporal Dunham immediately alerted his fellow Marines to the threat. Aware of the imminent danger and without hesitation, Corporal Dunham covered the grenade with his helmet and body, bearing the brunt of the explosion and shielding his Marines from the blast. In an ultimate and selfless act of bravery in which he was mortally wounded, he saved the lives of at least two fellow Marines. By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Dunham gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.

MONSOOR, MICHAEL, A. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as automatic weapons gunner for Naval Special Warfare Task Group Arabian Peninsula, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 29 September 2006. As a member of a combined SEAL and Iraqi Army Sniper Overwatch Element, tasked with providing early warning and stand-off protection from a rooftop in an insurgent held sector of Ar Ramadi, Iraq, Petty Officer Monsoor distinguished himself by his exceptional bravery in the face of grave danger. In the early morning, insurgents prepared to execute a coordinated attack by reconnoitering the area around the element’s position. Element snipers thwarted the enemy’s initial attempt by eliminating two insurgents. The enemy continued to assault the element, engaging them with a rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire. As enemy activity increased, Petty Officer Monsoor took position with his machine gun between two teammates on an outcropping of the roof. While the SEALs vigilantly watched for enemy activity, an insurgent threw a hand grenade from an unseen location, which bounced off Petty Officer Monsoor’s chest and landed in front of him. Although only he could have escaped the blast, Petty Officer Monsoor chose instead to protect his teammates. Instantly and without regard for his own safety, he threw himself onto the grenade to absorb the force of the explosion with his body, saving the lives of his two teammates. By his undaunted courage, fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

SMITH, PAUL R. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty: Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with an armed enemy near Baghdad International Airport, Baghdad, Iraq on 4 April 2003. On that day, Sergeant First Class Smith was engaged in the construction of a prisoner of war holding area when his Task Force was violently attacked by a company-sized enemy force. Realizing the vulnerability of over 100 fellow soldiers, Sergeant First Class Smith quickly organized a hasty defense consisting of two platoons of soldiers, one Bradley Fighting Vehicle and three armored personnel carriers. As the fight developed, Sergeant First Class Smith braved hostile enemy fire to personally engage the enemy with hand grenades and anti-tank weapons, and organized the evacuation of three wounded soldiers from an armored personnel carrier struck by a rocket propelled grenade and a 60mm mortar round. Fearing the enemy would overrun their defenses, Sergeant First Class Smith moved under withering enemy fire to man a.50 caliber machine gun mounted on a damaged armored personnel carrier. In total disregard for his own life, he maintained his exposed position in order to engage the attacking enemy force. During this action, he was mortally wounded. His courageous actions helped defeat the enemy attack, and resulted in as many as 50 enemy soldiers killed, while allowing the safe withdrawal of numerous wounded soldiers. Sergeant First Class Smith’s extraordinary heroism and uncommon valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Third Infantry Division “Rock of the Marne,” and the United States Army.

MURPHY, MICHAEL P. For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as the leader of a special reconnaissance element with Naval Special Warfare Task Unit Afghanistan on 27 and 28 June 2005. While leading a mission to locate a high-level anti-coalition militia leader, Lieutenant Murphy demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. On 28 June 2005, operating in an extremely rugged enemy-controlled area, Lieutenant Murphy’s team was discovered by anti-coalition militia sympathizers, who revealed their position to Taliban fighters. As a result, between 30 and 40 enemy fighters besieged his four-member team. Demonstrating exceptional resolve, Lieutenant Murphy valiantly led his men in engaging the large enemy force. The ensuing fierce firefight resulted in numerous enemy casualties, as well as the wounding of all four members of the team. Ignoring his own wounds and demonstrating exceptional composure, Lieutenant Murphy continued to lead and encourage his men. When the primary communicator fell mortally wounded, Lieutenant Murphy repeatedly attempted to call for assistance for his beleaguered teammates. Realizing the impossibility of communicating in the extreme terrain, and in the face of almost certain death, he fought his way into open terrain to gain a better position to transmit a call. This deliberate, heroic act deprived him of cover, exposing him to direct enemy fire. Finally achieving contact with his Headquarters, Lieutenant Murphy maintained his exposed position while he provided his location and requested immediate support for his team. In his final act of bravery, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country and for the cause of freedom. By his selfless leadership, courageous actions, and extraordinary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Murphy reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

In my lifetime, I have been honored to know five men who have been awarded our nation’s Medal of Honor. To a man, they are among the most humble Patriots I have ever met. To a man, they have told me that they did nothing more than the men next to them would have done, but for fate, it was their turn to act.

All five of those men are now in the company of their Creator. Each of them could claim 2 Timothy 4:7: “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.”

Monday, 26 May, is Memorial Day. Please set it aside in reverence for all those who have served with honor and are now departed. And please join me for a moment of silence at 1500 hours your local time, for remembrance and prayer.
Gentlemen, rest in peace. You have my gratitude! :flag: :patriot:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
Aman to that, rest in peace, your mission is done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
GeneticsDave said:
Remember that if you have a flag and pole, raise the flag to full mast in the morning, then lower it to half staff. Then at noon, raise it again to full mast.

As for those of use with little flag poles sticking off the side of our house or in the lawn, you don't actually have to lower the flag to half staff. You can either do nothing or tie a black ribbon to the top of the pole. If you tie a ribbon, it too should be removed at noon.

Have a happy and safe Memorial Day!

:raiseflag:
For those of you who have the house-mounted pole, this is what I was talking about:



Have a thoughtful Memorial Day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,195 Posts
Thank you Jeff, Cowboy, GeneticsDave and others! Today is truly a day of respect for those who have and are serving our country in defense of freedom here and throughout the world. Those who have provided the supreme sacrifice ought to be revered for their selfless sacrifice. Often people just go to put flowers on graves and with so many present it in many ways disrupts the ability to honor those who have fallen. I have sen children allowed to run all over graves unattended, people being disruptive of others etc.

Today is a day for remembrance and respect for those who have served, who have suffered, sometime most egregiously before giving their all. I want to specifically thank Jeff for presenting us with the heroic life ending stories of those who gave their all to protect their comrades in arms, who received Medal of Honor Citations after doing so. My eyes are still wet with tears as I have read their stories and still think of the sacrifice they made. They could have saved themselves, they could have looked forward to many years as husbands and fathers, they could have been entrepreneurs, but they chose to serve, not shirk their duty and responsibility and in doing so sacrificed all for the benefit of those with whom they served.

Today while attending bar-b-ques and family functions please remember to honor these many thousands of service men and women. Remind the family you are with of the sacredness of this day, pray for them and their families when you bless your food, and honor them with respect this day.

To my father who was a veteran and is deceased I say, I love you dad! :crying: I miss you terribly, and thank you for your selfless service!

Have a wonderful and safe Memorial Day!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,091 Posts
That is why I volunteer every year to attend the ceremonies at cemeteries. So these men and now women will not be forgotten. It still brings tears to my eyes when they play taps.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top