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I'm almost always up for some geocaching in the SL/Davis Counties. I used to cache a lot, but went off the grid for a number of years. I have picked it up again and buried my first cache and sent off my first travel bug.

If anyone ever wants to OC Cache, just let me know!

Post here when/where you are going if you'd like company!
 

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GeneticsDave said:
I'm almost always up for some geocaching in the SL/Davis Counties. I used to cache a lot, but went off the grid for a number of years. I have picked it up again and buried my first cache and sent off my first travel bug.

If anyone ever wants to OC Cache, just let me know!

Post here when/where you are going if you'd like company!
I've heard of this before I think in Arizona... Want to explain a little bit more about it, Dave?
 

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Geocaching is an entertaining adventure game for GPS users. Participating in a cache hunt is a good way to take advantage of the wonderful features and capability of a GPS unit. The basic idea is to have individuals and organizations set up caches all over the world and share the locations of these caches on the internet. GPS users can then use the location coordinates to find the caches. Once found, a cache may provide the visitor with a wide variety of rewards. All the visitor is asked to do is if they get something they should try to leave something for the cache.

A cache can come in many forms but the first item should always be the logbook. In its simplest form a cache can be just a logbook and nothing else. The logbook contains information from the founder of the cache and notes from the cache's visitors. The logbook can contain much valuable, rewarding, and entertaining information. A logbook might contain information about nearby attractions, coordinates to other unpublished caches, and even jokes written by visitors. If you get some information from a logbook you should give some back. At the very least you can leave the date and time you visited the cache.

Larger caches may consist of a waterproof plastic bucket placed tastefully within the local terrain. The bucket will contain the logbook and any number of more or less valuable items. These items turn the cache into a true treasure hunt. You never know what the founder or other visitors of the cache may have left there for you to enjoy. Remember, if you take something, its only fair for you to leave something in return. Items in a bucket cache could be: Maps, books, software, hardware, CD's, videos, pictures, money, jewelry, tickets, antiques, tools, games, etc. It is recommended that items in a bucket cache be individually packaged in a clear zipped plastic bag to protect them.

Quite often you may also find a trackable item. Groundspeak Trackables come in two types: Groundspeak Travel Bugs®, and official Geocoins.

A Groundspeak Travel Bug® is a trackable tag that you attach to an item, and which travels from cache to cache with the help of people like you. Each tag is etched with a unique code which the finder can use to log its travels on this website. Every Travel Bug® has a goal given by its owner, so if you think you can help it along on its journey feel free to take it with you.

Geocoins are special trackable coins created by other Geocachers to commemorate special events or as a signature item to leave in caches. They function exactly like Travel Bugs® and should be moved to another cache unless otherwise specified by their owners. The variety of different geocoins is staggering!

For more information, please visit Geocaching.com.
 

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I use to cache a lot. I would tag along with Bunkerdave a lot. It was fun till gas prices made it more difficult for me to go. Although that was before I had a handgun and permit.
 

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I've been actively Geocaching for a couple of years now. It is very fun and addictive. I have a couple caches stashed of my own and it is fun to have people from all over the world finding them. It is a great family activity. I take my 5 year old daughter and my 3 year old son all the time and even my 1 year old son when there isn't too much of a hike...
I actually just went out and checked on one of my caches last night OC'ing cause it was after dark and I had my gun on me anyway...
You do have to have a GPS and internet to download the cache coordinates.
You can get a reasonably descent unit for under $200.00 pretty easily..

Just my two cents...
 

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I have never done Geo Cashing.

I do a lot of work with GPS units. One of the ones I use at work, a Trimble, is only accurate to within 3 or 4 centimeters. Is that accurate enough for what you guys are doing? :dunno:

Tarzan
 

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Mazellan said:
I use to cache a lot. I would tag along with Bunkerdave a lot. It was fun till gas prices made it more difficult for me to go. Although that was before I had a handgun and permit.
Bunkerdave, huh? I've never met him, but I'd like to.

For non-cachers, Bunkerdave is a local legend for his straight-line approach to caching. Most people look for trails, routes around obstacles, etc., but Bunkerdave is famous for just following the pointer on his GPS over, under or through whatever may lie along the most direct route.
 

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I tried geocaching in a park near where I live and I didn't find it because the park rules say you have to stay on the trails and this one wasn't near a trail. :(

Tarzan1888 said:
I have never done Geo Cashing.

I do a lot of work with GPS units. One of the ones I use at work, a Trimble, is only accurate to within 3 or 4 centimeters. Is that accurate enough for what you guys are doing? :dunno:

Tarzan
That is plenty accurate but can you take one with you?

ian
 

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Yeah, that's too bad when people do that. They violate the rules and then everyone else who wants to find the cache is faced with a decision that they shouldn't have to make. You can report caches that are in restricted areas and the owner will be told to move it - it's an idea. I just hate to see destruction of nature beyond what is needed for us to get out there and enjoy it.
 

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Yeah, my little one likes it too. He is really into pirates, so we go looking for "buried treasure." :lol:
 

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jaredbelch said:
I love geocaching... Count me in.

In fact I've got the caches near our camping trip already downloaded to my GPS, and I've visited a few recently... I'll have to try and find the rest while we are there.
Sweet, I finally found another gun-toting Geo-Nerd! We should have done a few after lunch today 8) Cool bike BTW.
 

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ian husford said:
I tried geocaching in a park near where I live and I didn't find it because the park rules say you have to stay on the trails and this one wasn't near a trail. :(

Tarzan1888 said:
I have never done Geo Cashing.

I do a lot of work with GPS units. One of the ones I use at work, a Trimble, is only accurate to within 3 or 4 centimeters. Is that accurate enough for what you guys are doing? :dunno:

Tarzan
That is plenty accurate but can you take one with you?

ian
I can, but I don't think I want to. The whole thing including the back-pack and antenna weigh about 45 lb and it get old carrying it around real fast.

I prefer my Garmin 350 CS, for field work when I don't need survey accuracy.

Tarzan
 

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swillden said:
Mazellan said:
I use to cache a lot. I would tag along with Bunkerdave a lot. It was fun till gas prices made it more difficult for me to go. Although that was before I had a handgun and permit.
Bunkerdave, huh? I've never met him, but I'd like to.

For non-cachers, Bunkerdave is a local legend for his straight-line approach to caching. Most people look for trails, routes around obstacles, etc., but Bunkerdave is famous for just following the pointer on his GPS over, under or through whatever may lie along the most direct route.
Yep thats him lol. Someone I look up to (helps he is at least 6'3" or 4"). One of my few liberal friends. Oh the discussions we would have on driving to caches.
 

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GeneticsDave said:
jaredbelch said:
I love geocaching... Count me in.

In fact I've got the caches near our camping trip already downloaded to my GPS, and I've visited a few recently... I'll have to try and find the rest while we are there.
Sweet, I finally found another gun-toting Geo-Nerd! We should have done a few after lunch today 8) Cool bike BTW.
That would have been fun, but I was already on hour 2 of my 30 minute lunch. Next time we can sneak out early and go cachin'... Oh and the bike is as old as me, if that tells you anything, but thanks I'm pretty fond of it too.
 
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