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http://www.ksl.com/index.php?nid=148&sid=2816805

I usually sit these things out and watch, but being once VERY active in SAR in Oregon, but not this time.

I seem to be on the fence. An integral part is multi-agency ops that can be an amazing machine. Some people need to learn to play nice with others and accept the help and learn to coop. For example look @ the James Kim search out in Oregon awhile back. After the investigation one (Among many) thing was found: No cooperation between multiple agencies.

The other side of me sides with the volunteers. They pay their own gear, gas, take time from work, families, etc to save lives. They are part of something bigger that most of society cannot do. Then others are getting paid for what they are doing for free. The other thing that comes to mind is you get people who are paid to do it, who might not feel as passionate as the volunteers.

Enough ranting...Why cant we all get along :wink:
 

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With my wife being a volunteer in this area, I am very close to SAR people here. I side with them on this issue. I see how these people train, and I see their dedication to finding and rescuing victims.
In my opinion having deputies "trained" to assist will only get in the way of these people. Much time would be lost in getting the deputies up to speed on the search pattern and even more time would be lost if one of these "trained" deputies got themselves lost.

These volunteers are dedicated to what they do; my wife spent three years training with her dog. I support them in what they do.
 

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A couple of questions. Isn't SAR under the direction of the Sheriff's Dept., and run by the Sheriff's dept.?
Also, are they saying that Deputies are 'Un-trainable'? I imagine most SAR members started their career with very little experience, and had to be trained.

My guess is the Sheriff recognizes that, as with ALL SAR call outs, several deputies are assigned to assist. However, they find themselves sitting around unable to help because of lack of training. If they're already going to be there getting paid, they mighty as well get trained so they can help.

Sounds to me like some SAR guys are being a little over protective of their so-called ‘expert skills’.

jmo.
E
 

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Actually, the SAR guys are not paid; They are all volunteers.
When a search is called, normal deputies respond only to direct issues around the base camp, they are not in charge of the search.

SAR members, especially the high-angle guys that work in SL County, require years of training that can't be had just by saying they are going to do it. It will take many months of dedicated training, and money to pay for that training that will come out of the tax payers pockets.

This is like saying that just because the police have guns and body armor they can create a SWAT team.
 

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As I read the article, I'm still not sure why the SAR guys are quiting. It doesn't say anything about about Deputies taking over. It just says they will be trained so they can 'expanding their role'. So my question again, whats wrong with training more deputies to help?
(and no, it wont cost tax payers any additional money. the money is already there)
This is like saying that just because the police have guns and body armor they can create a SWAT team.
You can if you train them.
 

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TMG said:
As I read the article, I'm still not sure why the SAR guys are quiting. It doesn't say anything about about Deputies taking over. It just says they will be trained so they can 'expanding their role'. So my question again, whats wrong with training more deputies to help?
(and no, it wont cost tax payers any additional money. the money is already there)
This is like saying that just because the police have guns and body armor they can create a SWAT team.
You can if you train them.
The story doesn't explain everything.

The money is there to pay them to do the job they currently do. So to take the time to train them, let's say one year of 10 hours each week. You either pull them from patrol or investigations, or you pay overtime. Which would you prefer? Either way, it will cost money to train them.

I'll continue with the police analogy to keep it consistant: Having "trained" deputies who are not full time SAR personnel help in searches is like having a traffic cop help the DEA investigate a drug cartell.

(No offense to any police officers here, that's just the analogy I chose.)
 

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I have been a member of SAR in weber county for years, I am sure there is ALOT more to the story than what is being told, I have spent thousands of dollars on equipment and who knows how many hours of training, when I go out on a search and I am risking my life to try and save another, I want to know that the people I am with are as trained as I am and I know I can trust them with my life.

The deputies are the first on the scene when a call comes in, they determine if a call needs to go out and who needs to be called out, we have different teams, we have a first responder team that wants to be called out asap and will go out in any condition ( I am a member of that team ) we are all volunteers and take great pride in what we do. I don't know how I would feel about officers going out with me in extreme conditions untill they are well trained, most of our team members do this stuff for fun already, I am on the snowmobile team, and ground team in the summer, I love to ride and hike, I joined because I wanted the medical training that comes with it and because I wanted to help save lives, there is nothing more satisfying than seeing a family reunited with a loved one.

My wife says I joined just to get up in the middle of the night to go ride my snowmobile :) 75% of callouts are late at night
 
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