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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anythin wrong with lock mounting a loaded or unloaded shotgun inside your trunk?
 

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HamSlice said:
Anythin wrong with lock mounting a loaded or unloaded shotgun inside your trunk?
From a legal perspective, the answer depends on whether or not you have a permit. If you have a permit, you may legally carry a loaded long gun in your vehicle. If you don't have a permit, it must be unloaded.

From a safety perspective, I don't think it's wise to carry a loaded firearm in your vehicle unless the trigger is protected. With handguns, that means they should be in a good holster. Long guns probably require more creativity. Also, keep in mind that modern handguns are carefully designed so that they will not discharge without the trigger being pulled. Less care is taken in the design of most long guns, so unless you're sure that your shotgun cannot discharge without the trigger being pulled (e.g. from the forces of a collision), keep the chamber empty.

On balance, I think it's better just to keep the shotgun unloaded (no chambered shell).
 

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I'd guess no and definitely no if you have a CFP but that's just my opinion without reading the code.
 

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Hey now... part of the fun is watching the bad guy's face when you rack a shell into the chamber!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
UtahJarhead said:
Hey now... part of the fun is watching the bad guy's face when you rack a shell into the chamber!
I know right, it's nice to have the option.
 

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divegeek said:
If you have a permit, you may legally carry a loaded long gun in your vehicle. If you don't have a permit, it must be unloaded.
For some reason I was under the impression that you can't have a loaded long gun in the car, with or without a valid CWP. I know that Utahns are allowed a loaded pistol in their vehicle without any permit but are you sure about long guns?

It seems strange that I am questioning Divegeek so I must be nuts.

ian
 

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ian husford said:
divegeek said:
If you have a permit, you may legally carry a loaded long gun in your vehicle. If you don't have a permit, it must be unloaded.
For some reason I was under the impression that you can't have a loaded long gun in the car, with or without a valid CWP. I know that Utahns are allowed a loaded pistol in their vehicle without any permit but are you sure about long guns?
I am. :)

The statute that bans carrying a loaded long gun in your vehicle is 76-10-505 (3):

76-10-505. Carrying loaded firearm in vehicle or on street.
[...]
(3) Notwithstanding Subsection (1)(a)(i) and (ii), a person may not possess a loaded rifle, shotgun, or muzzle-loading rifle in a vehicle.
[...]
But per 76-10-523 (2), permit holders are exempt from the entire section:
76-10-523. Persons exempt from weapons laws.
[...]
(2) The provisions of Subsections 76-10-504(1) and (2), and Section 76-10-505 do not apply to any person to whom a permit to carry a concealed firearm has been issued:
(a) pursuant to Section 53-5-704; or
(b) by another state or county.
Still, it's safer to keep your long guns unloaded. They're not designed for loaded carry the same way handguns are.
 

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See? I am nuts for questioning it.

ian
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
divegeek said:
ian husford said:
divegeek said:
If you have a permit, you may legally carry a loaded long gun in your vehicle. If you don't have a permit, it must be unloaded.
For some reason I was under the impression that you can't have a loaded long gun in the car, with or without a valid CWP. I know that Utahns are allowed a loaded pistol in their vehicle without any permit but are you sure about long guns?
I am. :)

The statute that bans carrying a loaded long gun in your vehicle is 76-10-505 (3):

76-10-505. Carrying loaded firearm in vehicle or on street.
[...]
(3) Notwithstanding Subsection (1)(a)(i) and (ii), a person may not possess a loaded rifle, shotgun, or muzzle-loading rifle in a vehicle.
[...]
But per 76-10-523 (2), permit holders are exempt from the entire section:
76-10-523. Persons exempt from weapons laws.
[...]
(2) The provisions of Subsections 76-10-504(1) and (2), and Section 76-10-505 do not apply to any person to whom a permit to carry a concealed firearm has been issued:
(a) pursuant to Section 53-5-704; or
(b) by another state or county.
Still, it's safer to keep your long guns unloaded. They're not designed for loaded carry the same way handguns are.
I totally agree with keeping it safe and unloaded, I just couldn't find anything on the books about it. Thanks for the info.
 

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ian husford said:
See? I am nuts for questioning it.
:D

Questioning is always good! That's how we all learn... and sometimes it's the guy being questioned who learns the most.
 

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Sorry for bringing up an OLD thread....

I was told that It is illegal to carry a loaded rifle in a car. I can see that it is not.

I searched (admittedly not too hard) for a DWR rule against it, but could not find it. I respect the person that mentioned it to me; they tend to know UT gun laws well. We were talking about going from one "honey-hole" while prarrie dog hunting if that gives any perspective.

Any insite?
 

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It is illegal per Utah law.

http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE76/htm/76_10_050500.htm
76-10-505. Carrying loaded firearm in vehicle or on street.
(1) Unless otherwise authorized by law, a person may not carry a loaded firearm:
(a) in or on a vehicle, unless:
(i) the vehicle is in the person's lawful possession; or
(ii) the person is carrying the loaded firearm in a vehicle with the consent of the person lawfully in possession of the vehicle;
(b) on a public street; or
(c) in a posted prohibited area.
(2) Subsection (1)(a) does not apply to a minor under 18 years of age, since a minor under 18 years of age may not carry a loaded firearm in or on a vehicle.
(3) Notwithstanding Subsection (1)(a)(i) and (ii), a person may not possess a loaded rifle, shotgun, or muzzle-loading rifle in a vehicle.
(4) A violation of this section is a class B misdemeanor.
 

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CFP holders are exempt from that. However, IMO, it is pretty dumb to carry a loaded rifle, shotgun or muzzle loader in a vehicle. Unless you have control over it. Even then, not such a good idea. They don't have the safety systems that pistols have.
 

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"That word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

notwithstanding - "in spite of; without being opposed or prevented by"
 

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UtahJarhead said:
"That word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

notwithstanding - "in spite of; without being opposed or prevented by"
CFP holders are exempt from the entirety of 76-10-505.

76-10-523. Persons exempt from weapons laws.
(1) This part and Title 53, Chapter 5, Part 7, Concealed Weapon Act, do not apply to any of the following:
(a) a United States marshal;
(b) a federal official required to carry a firearm;
(c) a peace officer of this or any other jurisdiction;
(d) a law enforcement official as defined and qualified under Section 53-5-711;
(e) a judge as defined and qualified under Section 53-5-711;
(f) a common carrier while engaged in the regular and ordinary transport of firearms as merchandise; or
(g) a nonresident traveling in or through the state, provided that any firearm is:
(i) unloaded; and
(ii) securely encased as defined in Section 76-10-501.
(2) The provisions of Subsections 76-10-504(1) and (2), and Section 76-10-505 do not apply to any person to whom a permit to carry a concealed firearm has been issued:
(a) pursuant to Section 53-5-704; or
(b) by another state or county.
 

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Ah, crap. I had it in my head that the 505. par 3 overrode that, but re-reading it that's definitely not the case. However, it's still a terrible idea since very few rifles have anywhere near the safety features of your average handgun.
 

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UtahJarhead said:
However, it's still a terrible idea since very few rifles have anywhere near the safety features of your average handgun.
+1

There's a nearly zero chance that any modern, properly-maintained handgun will discharge unless the trigger is operated, no matter how violently you slam it around. Because of the nature of handguns, how they're used and how they're carried, a lot of design effort goes into making sure that they can't "go off". The same is not true of long guns, especially sporting guns.

In addition, handguns are carried in holsters which are specifically designed to protect the trigger, while long guns are often carried without any sort of trigger protection. In a car accident stuff is flying all over the place and even if the force of the collision doesn't cause a discharge, something could hit and operate the trigger.

Finally, rifles and shotguns are more powerful than handguns. Rifles in particular have much greater muzzle velocities and much higher penetration, so in the event of a negligent discharge the odds of someone being injured or killed are much higher.

So, if you must carry a loaded long gun in your vehicle (if you have a CFP), make sure:

  • It's a design which cannot be made to discharge by striking the weapon;[/*]
  • It is secured in a way which completely covers and protects the trigger, and that the protection can't be dislodged by the force of a collision; and[/*]
  • It is secured with the muzzle pointing in the safest direction possible. Straight down is best, straight up isn't as good, but probably acceptable.[/*]
The above list applies to handguns as well, but the first two items are already addressed by carrying a good gun secured in a good holster. And most carry methods tend to position the handgun muzzle-down, as well.
 
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