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I liked your review, though I would like to point out a few things. First is that Glock pistols have 3 safety features. The first is the external "trigger" safety. Internally there are the "firing pin safety" and the "drop safety". It's important to remember that just because we don't see something, doesn't mean that it isn't there. :wink: As for the "load indicator", there is one located on the extractor of the Glock. There is a tab on the extractor that will protrude when the chamber is "hot".





You may not see this on the older Glock pistols (generation 1 or 2), but will see them on all current production pistols. Glock pistols don't have the "grip safety" or "striker indicator", but IMHO both aren't necessary. Proper training and safe firearms handling will keep you from putting a round in your leg. Remember that your finger should be OFF OF THE TRIGGER until you're ready to shoot.

...So, in theory, if my finger is still on the trigger and I goto re-holster...
This should NEVER happen. Train frequently and properly to assure that you keep your finger in a safe place. This is the common reason for ND incidents.

One thing that you can do with a Glock that you can't do with a XD is change the trigger weight. There are several different configurations that will result in 4 different trigger weights. Your common Glock pistol comes with the "5.5lb" trigger. I have all of my Glock pistols set at a 8lb trigger. For competitive purposes, you can set the trigger as low as 3.5lbs. It's a matter of personal choice.

I don't agree with the FBI guy you talked with. I own 3 Glock 27 pistols. There is no problem having 2 (or 3, 4, 5, etc.) of the same firearm. So your department issues you a Glock 22, what's the problem? If you already own a G22 and know what it does as well as know it inside and out, you're already ahead of others who may not be too familiar with the firearm. If the problem lies with mixing up the parts, then here's a simple answer; don't break both of them down at the same time. My Glock pistols have the serial number on the barrel, slide and frame. These are the three components that you will have in front of you when it's field stripped.

Bottom line is that having the multiple "safety" features won't make you a better shooter, gun owner, father, husband, etc. I have many firearms that have a variety of safety features. No matter what firearm I'm handling, I know that I'm safe due to constant awareness, SAFE FIREARMS HANDLING procedures and an in depth knowledge of the firearms that I own. Thing to remember that the "safest" gun can kill you if you don't use it properly.

gf
 

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sculptingmyguns said:
They won't make you better at any of the things you mentioned but I don't think he idicated they would, but they certainly do increase your odds in avoiding mishaps and accidents. Even those that are attentive to safety have made errors from time to time, no one is perfect despite ones best efforts. Even the most experienced gun owners have made safety errors or lost their focus, I guess its part of being an imperfect human. Why not help increase you odds even more of never having a problem. It is really hard to argue against well implemented safety features. My understanding is the Xd's also have the internal safties mentioned in the response. My opinion is I wouldnt not want to own multiples of the same gun, but I guess in my mind, there is no reason to own a glock anyway :ROFL: Kidding, to each their own.
Proper training with your firearm will prevent mishaps. Having "too many" safety devices can be a bad thing in a defensive situation. Think of the many folks who forget to disengage the "slide safety" and cock the hammer on their 1911 firearms. This is why it's important to train with your firearms and to train under various circumstances.

I'm not saying that I'm "perfect". I am saying that I am confident in my abilities and don't have to puchase a gun because I think it will be "safe" due to the "safety features". Don't really care how the XD is put together. I think it's a fine gun and has it's place. I've seen the XD fail on numerous occasions. I've seen a couple of Glock pistols as well. The major concern that I have is that the Glock has been around a lot longer than the XD. The failures I've seen in the XD are a lot more critical than the Glock. With a broken trigger spring, you're still able to fire a Glock, OTOH if your slide pin pops out and your slide is no longer in tact, that could be a much bigger problem. As I said earlier, the XD is a good gun, but not one that I would bet my life on. If it's all I had to defend myself, then maybe. Given other options, I'd have to seriously consider what my options are.

The OP talked about a DEPARTMENT ISSUED firearm. You talk about "owning" multiples of a firearm. If it's DEPARTMENT ISSUED, it's owned by the DEPARTMENT, not the individual LEO.

You may see no need to own a Glock, though I can think of a few reasons why I would purchase a XD. Just because I woudln't use a firearm to defend myself, doesn't mean that it isn't a great gun to take to the range and shoot off a few rounds. I know of two local gun shops that have the XD selling at under $500. They brought the gun in a little over a year ago, and it has been on the shelf since. A XD9 would be a fun gun to have considering the cost of 9mm ammo vs. .40 s&w. :wink:

gf
 

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When I first began teaching NRA pistol classes, the "finger off the trigger" idea was really hammered home. One place where your finger is well off of the trigger happens to be where the load indicator is on the Glock. I've incorporated this in the way I shoot and find that it's an excellent secondary indicator of the chamber being "hot". The first would be me conciously loading a full magazine and chambering a round.

Keep in mind that your focus should be on the front sight post. Three things should be in view. This would be the target, front sight post and the rear sight. Target and rear sight should be slighly blurred, but the front sight should be clear. The chamber indicator on the XD is a distraction IMO.

If you like the XD and it works for you, that's great. Just be sure that you don't get confused when breaking down the two guns. I've known a couple of guys who did. :wink:

gf
 

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MarshallDodge said:
glock fan said:
One thing that you can do with a Glock that you can't do with a XD is change the trigger weight. There are several different configurations that will result in 4 different trigger weights. Your common Glock pistol comes with the "5.5lb" trigger. I have all of my Glock pistols set at a 8lb trigger. For competitive purposes, you can set the trigger as low as 3.5lbs. It's a matter of personal choice.

gf
Maybe I am confused by your statement but the trigger weight on a XD can be changed by a competent gunsmith.
My point is that the trigger adjustment is a lot simpler with the Glock. No trip to a gunsmith required.

gf
 

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swillden said:
glock fan said:
Three things should be in view. This would be the target, front sight post and the rear sight. Target and rear sight should be slighly blurred, but the front sight should be clear. The chamber indicator on the XD is a distraction IMO.
Hey, gf, I know you hate XDs but you're really reaching on that one ;)

I've never been distracted -- at all -- by the LCI, but I just pulled out my gun to take another look. By the time the front sight dot is anywhere near in line with the rear sight dots, the LCI is completely occluded by the bottom of the rear sight. Even when the front sight is far enough above the rear sight that the LCI is visible, it's the same color as the slide and blends in unless you're specifically looking for t. In contrast (literally), the white dot of the front sight is instantly visible.
For the record, I don't "hate" the XD. I'm actually looking at a XD 9 and XD 40. I'm simply relaying the feedback that I got from students that came through my NRA Basic Pistol class. I've found that it's about 40/25/20 on how gun sales go after the class. That's 40% purchase a Glock, 25% purchase a M&P, 20% purchase a XD, and 15% purchase some other type of handgun.

It's not my intent to "slam" any gun, but rather to simply set the record straight when there is inaccurate info being shared about my firearm of choice. :wink:

They're all good guns. They have things I like, and things I don't like about them. There are 2 particular guns that I will recommend against. Friends have come to me and asked about the guns and I tactfully inform them that there's a reason that they're no longer in business. :)

gf
 

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The trigger pull on Glocks are easier to modify. The stock Glock comes with a 5.5lb trigger. Many departments require a slightly heavier trigger pull (8lbs.) this is commonly called the "New York Trigger". Changing the trigger pull from 5.5lbs to 8lbs can be done very quickly and doesn't require any specialized training or gunsmithing. All of my CC Glocks have the 8lb trigger. A lot of LEO like their off duty firearm to have the stock 5.5lb trigger.

Just one of a couple of reasons why I thinkt the Glock is more popular among LE agencies.

gf
 

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MarshallDodge said:
glock fan said:
The trigger pull on Glocks are easier to modify. The stock Glock comes with a 5.5lb trigger. Many departments require a slightly heavier trigger pull (8lbs.) this is commonly called the "New York Trigger". Changing the trigger pull from 5.5lbs to 8lbs can be done very quickly and doesn't require any specialized training or gunsmithing. All of my CC Glocks have the 8lb trigger. A lot of LEO like their off duty firearm to have the stock 5.5lb trigger.

Just one of a couple of reasons why I thinkt the Glock is more popular among LE agencies. gf
Reminds me of this scenario:

Nothing against you gf but I find increasing the weight of an already long and heavy trigger to 8 lbs. a solution to a different problem - poor training. I guess it's cheaper to change the trigger pull than to provide training on good gun handling skills. :roll:
Call it whatever you like, as Mr. Gaston Glock agrees with you. The reason why the "New York Trigger" came to be was due to a substantial order from New York law enforcement agencies. Poor training or not, the two stage "New York Trigger" is standard for many LE agencies.

It's a matter of personal preference, which is a good thing. If you want a lighter trigger, you can reduce the trigger pull to 3.5lbs by a simple modification.

gf
 
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