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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering purchasing a rifle for hunting Deer and Elk. I think I would like to go with a .308 rifle. As I've been looking a different guns many of the .308 are classified as varmint rifles. Does that mean that it shouldn't be used on big game? Or can it be used with light bullet on varmints and with a heavier bullet on Elk? I really like remington 700 VTR(varmint-tactical rifle). I would appreciate any information as to the limitations of a .308 varmint rifle.

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the .308 is an excellent round for deer and elk and i would recommend you get one. The .308 can be used for varmints with some .308 accelerator rounds[these are very light bullets with a sabot]. I shoot a .308 and love it cause it is better than an 30-06 within a hundred yards and you can still knock stuff down at farther ranges with it. I use 150 grain hornady light magnums and have dropped three mule deer with these. I would not use the .308 for varmints although you can.
 
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Im really glad you asked that question, I have wondered that myself for some time. it would seem like even the lighter loads would be a bit of overkill for varmints. Of course, maybe it depends on how one defines varmints :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess my question is, "Is there something unique about the .308 varmint rifle that makes it different from a .308 that isn't classified as a varmint rifle?
 
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I think anymore they can call it a varmint rifle if they stick a heavy barrel on it. I know with the .17hmr rifle I bought the 452 Varmint, the only real difference between it and the 452 American is the heavy barrel.

As far as a hunting rifle is concerned, of course a heavy barrel model is going to weigh more generally and you will get to enjoy lugging the extra weight around. I took a look at Remingtons website and they say it weighs 7.5 lbs which isn't too bad of course adding the scope etc, will weigh it down a bit more. I have seen this rifle around and is certainly one I also am considering in the .308. I would love to have one, after other people invest in it first of course so I can see if it is a smart buy :D If you get one, I would love to hear how you like it.
 

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I'm glad you brought this topic up because the gun you mention is going to be my next purchase. I'm not exactly sure which variant of the Remington 700 I want, but I've narrowed it down to that model.
 

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caldweller said:
I am considering purchasing a rifle for hunting Deer and Elk. I think I would like to go with a .308 rifle. As I've been looking a different guns many of the .308 are classified as varmint rifles. Does that mean that it shouldn't be used on big game? Or can it be used with light bullet on varmints and with a heavier bullet on Elk? I really like remington 700 VTR(varmint-tactical rifle). I would appreciate any information as to the limitations of a .308 varmint rifle.

Thanks
The .308 is an excellent caliber for animals the size of deer and elk. The one main reason for choosing this caliber over a 30-06 is the shorter action. You can find the .308 in light weight rifles that are easy to pack deer hunting all day.

The term "Varmint Rifle " describes the style of the gun rather than its use for hunting varmints. The Varmint Rifle has a longer and heavier barrel and weighs a couple of pounds more. This of course makes it a great shooter up ranges of 300 plus yards.

If your main use for the rifle is to hunt deer and elk, I may be inclined to get a lighter rifle. Packing a 9 + pound rifle around in the mountains all day gets tiresome.

When it comes right down to the shooting though, the heavier rifle is great. You will just have to decide if it is worth packing the extra weight.

If you really want a rifle for varmints, may I suggest another caliber more suited for varmint shooting such as the .223, or 22-250?

(Edit to fix typo)
 
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