Personal regimen

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Re: Personal regimen

Postby MarshallDodge » Tue 28 Jan 2014 1:53 pm

I am by no means an expert but I have taken multiple defensive pistol classes from entry level to advanced.

People that shoot at an advanced level have several things in common:

1. Practice often. Just like a musician, it is better to practice 10 minutes a day rather than 10 hours once a month. I try to get to the range every other week at a minimum and shoot at least 50 rounds of ammo.

2. Have a standard for accuracy and speed that you are working toward, and track yourself. Keep a log of how you are progressing toward your goal.

3. Consistency. I have learned that jumping from one model of gun to a different model to another model will only slow you down in making advances in skill level. Going from a Glock with a striker style trigger to a Sig with a DA/SA trigger can take a lot of time to learn. Changing your holster position or brand can mess with your draw. Pick a good gun and gear then stay with your chosen system for an extended period of time.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby Durdenz » Tue 28 Jan 2014 5:25 pm

D-FIN wrote:Safety is not a de-coker then?


Not on the the witness no. On some other CZ clones it's a de-cocker but that one it isn't. Not sure why EAA chose to run it that way.
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Re: Personal regimen (Tanfoglio Witness P-S)

Postby metalgimp » Tue 28 Jan 2014 7:43 pm

Durdenz wrote:
D-FIN wrote:Safety is not a de-coker then?


Not on the the witness no. On some other CZ clones it's a de-cocker but that one it isn't. Not sure why EAA chose to run it that way.


I was disappointed but not enough to ditch it. I just adapted. Now that I'm more familiar with it, I'm thinking of getting another for backup.
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Re: Personal regimen (dry fire)

Postby metalgimp » Tue 28 Jan 2014 7:48 pm

I just thought of something that's bugged me, and I'd like advice.

One of the training patterns is to draw or pull with dry fire. Okay, I'm okay with that. But, how do I know I'm on target? Does it even matter?
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby althor » Tue 28 Jan 2014 8:52 pm

metalgimp wrote:I just thought of something that's bugged me, and I'd like advice.

One of the training patterns is to draw or pull with dry fire. Okay, I'm okay with that. But, how do I know I'm on target? Does it even matter?


It matters if I'm on the street someday next to your intended target.

I wouldn't get into the habit of practicing drawing and firing before you are on target or someday you may revert to your level of training in a real self defense situation. Who knows who you'll hit then...

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Re: Personal regimen

Postby UtahJarhead » Tue 28 Jan 2014 10:18 pm

metalgimp wrote:I just thought of something that's bugged me, and I'd like advice.

One of the training patterns is to draw or pull with dry fire. Okay, I'm okay with that. But, how do I know I'm on target? Does it even matter?

When dry firing doesn't matter if you're on target. Dry firing is used to work on the fundamentals. When drawing, does your gun snag on clothing? Are you able to thumb the safety without looking? Do you have good follow through?
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby D-FIN » Tue 28 Jan 2014 11:06 pm

When practicing draws you should NOT be pulling the trigger after every draw. Otherwise if you ever need to draw down on somebody and your traIning kicks in you may find yourself firing before you fully evaluate the situation. You may be able to end the encounter without firing but if you fire automatically following your draw you lose the option. You should ready to fire but you don't want it automated in your training.
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Re: Personal regimen (drawing practice)

Postby metalgimp » Wed 29 Jan 2014 11:21 am

Okay, what I'm hearing/understanding is:
1) Drawing does not mean shooting. So, the drawing drills are intended to:
a. Clear your sidearm so you can draw,
b. Take off the safety if engaged,
c. /Not/ be a gunslinger,
d. Pull up properly (not swinging my arm but pushing from my chest), and
e. Sight in and placing my finger on the trigger.

2) Dry firing:
- Does not necessarily ready me to line up (that's what the drawing drills are for),
- Familiarizes the reflexes for the recoil without actually creating the recoil,
- Trains the muscles keep the weapon straight

3) There should be no difference in accuracy--during training--between drawing and straight target practice.

Do I have that right?

*What's "follow through"?
*[Really, really stupid question] If drawing and lining up only to wait (while sighting in), what do I do next? If it's to assess the situation, shouldn't I have done this before presentation?
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby D-FIN » Wed 29 Jan 2014 1:06 pm

I would modify (e.) Don't put your finger on the trigger until you are ready and have decided to shoot. Index it above the trigger.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby moyler » Wed 29 Jan 2014 2:15 pm

In my humble opinion you are training some bad habits into your gun handling. In addition, some of your 'protocol' is unsafe.

The main things that stand out:

If your gun has an external safety, use it. There is no guarantee it will not be engaged when you need to shoot the most, and not training to disengage the safety may cost you more than just time. If your gun's ergonomics are not to your liking then sell it. It sounds like you need a Glock or M&P with no external safety.

Also, You already admitted to a negligent discharge by trying to ease the hammer down as your solution to not engaging the safety. This is doubling down on unsafe practice. Please reconsider this tactic, you have proven it to yourself it is unsafe, that should be enough.

The other stuff is less 'life threatening', dealing more with your techniques, dry fire and live fire. You would greatly benefit from formal training. You mentioned Front Sight. Even if you get the class for free you will still spend around $1,000. by the time you account for travel, food, lodging, etc., etc. I would recommend local training. That thousand bucks will get you around 5 local classes. I am not just pimping my own classes. I recommend training with Chris Willden or Dennis Kennedy as well. In my entry level pistol class, as well as other similar classes, you will learn more by lunch time than you will in a 4 day pistol class at Front Sight, and you won't have to endure the out-dated and baseless modern technique dogma. I know some here like FS, but guys that have gone to FS and also had quality local training will tell you the same thing.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby UtahCFP » Wed 29 Jan 2014 6:32 pm

A question --

If the hammer is lowered, does that mean that the gun could fire if dropped in such a way that the hammer makes sharp contact?
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Personal regimen

Postby UtahCFP » Wed 29 Jan 2014 6:36 pm

"you will learn more by lunch time than you will in a 4 day pistol class at Front Sight"

Much of the four days is training in muscle memory in a pattern of increasing complexity (with students practicing in off hours as well).
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby moyler » Wed 29 Jan 2014 7:37 pm

UtahCFP wrote:A question --

If the hammer is lowered, does that mean that the gun could fire if dropped in such a way that the hammer makes sharp contact?

Concerning, isn't it...
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby quychang » Wed 29 Jan 2014 9:21 pm

Just my two cents, in my mostly self trained point of view. I usually carry an FNX 9mm it has both a safety and a decocker. I carry with the hammer down and safety on. When I first bought it I was less than confident in the decocker. One of the first things I did was take it to the range and use the decocking lever with the gun pointed down range, probably 75-100 times, until I felt confident that it wouldn't ND. Overkill? Probably, but even now I point it in a safe direction when using the lever. The point? I have enough bad habits in my life that I don't need to add any I can easily control in how I handle firearms. I do need to look in to some local training and/or at least get to the range more often.

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Re: Personal regimen

Postby metalgimp » Thu 30 Jan 2014 1:28 pm

moyler wrote:
UtahCFP wrote:A question --

If the hammer is lowered, does that mean that the gun could fire if dropped in such a way that the hammer makes sharp contact?

Concerning, isn't it...


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