Personal regimen

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Re: Personal regimen

Postby moyler » Thu 30 Jan 2014 1:44 pm

metalgimp wrote:
moyler wrote:
UtahCFP wrote:A question --

If the hammer is lowered, does that mean that the gun could fire if dropped in such a way that the hammer makes sharp contact?

Concerning, isn't it...


Moyler-
Please finish your sentence. It's not obvious to me.

Dr. Dave's question was basically, if your gun were to be accidentally dropped could it potentially, negligently discharge by the hammer/firing pin's impact on the cartridge's primer beneath it. Your gun does not have a de-cocking mechanism like Mel's FN, or some SIGS, which are meant to be de-cocked and carried in double action mode, essentially preventing this type of discharge as well as the one you experienced. I just commented that the potential answer of 'maybe' to Dave's question was, "concerning".

I hope that clarifies.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby Volsung » Fri 31 Jan 2014 10:00 am

metalgimp wrote:*What's "follow through"?
*[Really, really stupid question] If drawing and lining up only to wait (while sighting in), what do I do next? If it's to assess the situation, shouldn't I have done this before presentation?

"Follow-through is the continuation of the application of the shooting fundamentals through and immediately after the shot. Follow-through enables the shooter to integrate, maintain and continue all the shooting fundamentals before, during, and immediately after firing the shot." (Straight out of the NRA Basic Pistol manual)

This means you maintain proper sight alignment and sight picture, proper grip and stance, breathing and trigger control before, during, and after the shot. Your gun should return to the target immediately after the shot breaks. During follow-through you maintain trigger control as you let the trigger out to reset. This is strikingly similar to baseball and golf. Your swing continues after you hit the ball and you maintain a focus on the ball during follow-through.

To answer your second question, you should always be assessing the situation. This is situational awareness. If you are carrying a concealed firearm, and have made the decision to draw, you should have already made the decision to shoot. However, your finger should not make contact with the trigger until your sights are on the target and you have assessed that there is no one in the target's foreground or background. So, assessment continues during your presentation and follow-through. Before making a shot in a defensive situation, you need to be absolutely sure that you do not hit any innocent bystanders (this includes me and me family).

There are no stupid questions here except the one you don't ask.
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Re: Personal regimen (interview with cop)

Postby metalgimp » Sun 02 Feb 2014 1:47 pm

Follow through:
Thanks. That makes a lot of sense, and I didn't know the term for it.

A neighbor-cop spoke to me about several of my questions, and here is what /their/ perspective is. (I caveat what he told me with his profession, because as a citizen, I won't have his training, responsibility, or experience. Also, maybe it's a little childish/myopic of me, but I will defend him tenaciously, because first, I have the very deepest respect for police and armed forces, and second, he's a good man.)

Dropped hammer vs. safety:
When on duty, he never has the safety on. Off duty, he has it on. However from how he spoke, I gathered that off duty configuration will change based on circumstance. He looked my firearm over; I pointed out that it has a 8+ lb. trigger pull in a double action state. In conclusion he advised me that I do what I feel is right and from there be consistent.

Post-draw assessment (he was very careful in how he responded to this, and I was very, very impressed):
At all times assessments of the situation are maintained. However (!), once he draws, he's committed to using lethal force. [The following part was amazing!] They are trained to turn their heads /regularly/ right and left to ascertain new new information /and/ to break the naturally associated tunnel vision during an incident.

Whether on this board or during personal interviews, I can only say that all of you are really an inspiration to my family and me.

FYI-
Yesterday I practiced drawing and removing the safety and began to get a rhythm, but putting on the safety was very, very difficult with the pistol in a ready-to-fire grip. I'm not yet fully comfortable, but I'm trying.
Last edited by metalgimp on Sun 09 Feb 2014 6:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Personal regimen (cop says, "We like [CC]!")

Postby metalgimp » Sun 02 Feb 2014 2:16 pm

I must add from my interview with my neighbor-cop something that I hope you readers would find not only surprising but inspiring.

The first time we spoke regarding citizen concealed carry, he stated something that floored me: "We [UT] like that [CCs]." I was able to follow up with him during my recent interview.

The large majority of the UT police force do like citizen CC. Why?
1) The people who get them are very serious (he said 9/10) about learning as much as they can and doing their best.
2) They [UT cops] know that they can't be everywhere and having someone they at a scene can prevent fatalities.

I then asked him what I could do to merit the trust that cops have for CC. He said, "you're doing it by learning and practicing."
Last edited by metalgimp on Sun 09 Feb 2014 6:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Personal regimen (holsters)

Postby metalgimp » Sun 09 Feb 2014 6:43 pm

While trying out different things, I've found I *hate* the holsters that have a 45 degree angle towards the front. I cannot figure out how a person can draw without spraining a wrist! So, I've taken to making my own holster with a radically modified pattern from Tandy Leather. So far it works well, but I still haven't tried drawing in a range.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby althor » Sun 09 Feb 2014 7:53 pm

I've never seen a holster with that much of a cant... except for a SOB.

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Re: Personal regimen

Postby dewittdj » Sun 09 Feb 2014 9:02 pm

Blackhawk Serpa holsters are angle adjustable, 2 positions forward cant and 2 positions rearward cant, with a 5th position straight up/down (90 degree).

The cant angle allows for individual with shorter arms to clear the holster using the additional room that the cant provides. I've even seen individuals use the rearward cant on a right-side holster worn on the left side for a cross-draw. This is more difficult to master so that you don't sweep anything or anyone during the draw.
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Re: Personal regimen (holsters)

Postby moyler » Mon 10 Feb 2014 9:31 am

metalgimp wrote:While trying out different things, I've found I *hate* the holsters that have a 45 degree angle towards the front. I cannot figure out how a person can draw without spraining a wrist! So, I've taken to making my own holster with a radically modified pattern from Tandy Leather. So far it works well, but I still haven't tried drawing in a range.

We're all different shapes and sizes, thus so many holster options, with many of them adjustable. Most will start at 3:00 (for right handers, and 9:00 for lefties) with just a slight forward cant. As the position moves rearward the forward can't is more pronounced. Thus, as the position moves forward towards appendix carry the cant is almost straight up and down, or even a slight rearward cant.

If you're able to register for the Dry Fire Fundamentals class this month, you'll have an opportunity to try several carry set ups and practice your draw, presentation and re holstering from them all. It takes most shooters several setups, holsters and carry positions before they find what works for them. Save your next shoe box and label it "Holsters" for the inevitable 'box filling' that is likely.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby metalgimp » Mon 10 Feb 2014 5:38 pm

althor wrote:I've never seen a holster with that much of a cant... except for a SOB.


I'm not going to touch "SOB"... :]

I should post the original plans for the holster I made. I'm used to a 90 deg. "cant" (I'm assuming that is the correct usage), but the muzzle obviously has to clear smoothly. Otherwise, like Moyler stated, it's going to meet the shoebox.
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby D-FIN » Mon 10 Feb 2014 5:42 pm

metalgimp wrote:
althor wrote:I've never seen a holster with that much of a cant... except for a SOB.


I'm not going to touch "SOB"... :]

I should post the original plans for the holster I made. I'm used to a 90 deg. "cant" (I'm assuming that is the correct usage), but the muzzle obviously has to clear smoothly. Otherwise, like Moyler stated, it's going to meet the shoebox.


SOB = Small of Back
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby metalgimp » Mon 10 Feb 2014 5:52 pm

dewittdj wrote:... I've even seen individuals use the rearward cant on a right-side holster worn on the left side for a cross-draw. This is more difficult to master so that you don't sweep anything or anyone during the draw.


I noted how it seemed to be suited for cross-drawing, but I was very concerned about time, accuracy, and coordination during an event. The holster I'm currently wearing is a paddle style, "Tagua." Nice and sturdy and easy to put on, but it hangs out making it less concealed.
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Preparation: What is the distance of a typical assault?

Postby metalgimp » Sun 20 Apr 2014 3:47 pm

I've taken a few courses (don't, please, be impressed), and they state that practicing for accuracy beyond 25' is a waste of time when training for self-protection. Further, I've heard that most assaults are within 15'! I struggle with that, because I'd honestly have no time to pull and shoot. Combat at 25' vs. 15' are entirely different animals, my gut says. Using lethal force beyond 25' smacks of cop-wannabe, and using a sidearm within 15' seems suicidal because the malefactor would have control of your weapon. So I've have to step back from my personal regimen and consider how I can be most effective.

Any thoughts?
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby UtahJarhead » Sun 20 Apr 2014 4:25 pm

I don't care HOW close a person is, I'm of the opinion that a flying chunk of lead > all. If you can stab a person, you can pull a trigger.

At any rate, if you're taking classes I assume you've heard of the Tueller drill?
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby metalgimp » Mon 21 Apr 2014 4:35 pm

UtahJarhead wrote:I don't care HOW close a person is, I'm of the opinion that a flying chunk of lead > all. If you can stab a person, you can pull a trigger.

At any rate, if you're taking classes I assume you've heard of the Tueller drill?


Nope. (No, I'm not abashed at admitting my utter ignorance.)
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Re: Personal regimen

Postby moyler » Mon 21 Apr 2014 9:14 pm

UtahJarhead wrote:..If you can stab a person, you can pull a trigger.

Ummm. Nope.. you'd be wrong, at least as I am presuming your context. In my classes we dispel foolish notions like this. There are many very effective layers to "defense", before a gun is even in play.
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